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Episode · 1 year ago

Make Money With Podcasting! Phil Pelucha Interview

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Make Money With Podcasting!

Are you curious how to monetize your podcast??

In this important interview, our Content Scientist, Scott Ayres, will interview podcasting expert Phil Pelucha from "Billionaires in Boxers" to find out what makes a podcast profitable!

Welcome to the social media lab live podcasts of a scudder's here with a social media lab powered by a Gore pulse, where we bust a myth, two rumors and the stories social media marketing with science. Today I'm replaying my interview with feel Polluchcha Fun Guy and the dude knows so much about podcasting that I'll absolutely blow your mind. We're going to walk through how you monetize your podcast, how can podcast enhance your business marketing? What are different things you can do with podcasting? He has a company called billionaires and boxers, which is literally the website billionaires and Boxerscom, and we taught he talks about what he's done with podcasting, how he's monetized and how he's made like a killing with podcasting, something I wish I would do better. So I encourage you to listen to the full episode here. It's a little bit to take in. I encourage you to take notes. Also encourage to go over to social media lab dot live. As Social Media Lab dot live you can see all the interviews we've done here in these social media lab live show and follow US wherever you're listening to that and give us a subscribe. I you know, good review, I certainly would appreciate. Now onto my interview, would feel Polucha. I feel polucha is is the founding partner and CEO of a company called billionaires and boxers, and I love that name. His goal is to empower one billion entrepreneurs globally and he says he's probably podcasting right now during this show. So so welcome to the show. Feel appreciate you hopping on with us today. Thanks so much for the invite. Looking forward to it. Now I've got to I've got to get this out of the way first, because my brain is, you know, all over the place. Billionaires and boxers, where did you get that name and why? Yeah, you know, I always I always say the same thing here, which is I really wish I had a sexy a answer than the truth, but I'm just going to go with the truth. Right. It was we, the podcast was originally called something else. It was called the big boom business pod, and we then got picked up by, yeah, exactly. We got picked up by a few radio stations and we kind of joined this like the business part of an existing radio station. So we will always branded under their name. Is just kind of like the business talk show bit. So when we got picked up by our first TV network to put our first series together, they were like you need a name for the show, and everything I suggested they they hated with a passion, to the point where I started getting silly with it, and I was like, how about billionaires in boxes, because I'm growing my global empire from home and I rarely put on pants. Well, they're like that's good. When I thought it was going to be and you know, I was like, okay, should I ask feel to show us if he has pants on or not? But yeah, let's not go there. It's it's and up and you need it's still before the watershed, so but it let's leave the mystery there. So I appreciate you get that. Tell me. So you talked about your podcast kind of getting picked up. What's your background? How long have you been podcasting? Kind of what your what's your history like? What is your you know, Sixty and ninety second elevator pitch on why I should even bother listening to you about podcasts? Sure, so, I've been podcasting for over ten years, over tenzero now. Was a podcasting ranked as one of the top one hundred podcasters globally and I've been coaching other people, particularly businesses, how to use it to build authority and to win clients for all come up for six years now, so just over five years. It's been a fun journey. But my background was not in production. I'm a surveyor by trade, a real estate surveyor, and I work in the corporate world and then left to go and set up my own business and, you know, rather than naively, and people will be laughing at this, I'm sure, I kind of thought the phone would just ring. I done pretty well in my corporate career, so people are just going to call me to work with me. And Yeah, that didn't happen. So I kind of found myself, you know, unsure what to do with social media marketing. I didn't want to call call people because, you know, I hated it when people used to cold call me, so I didn't want to do that to people. But I also didn't have the budget to be able to compete with my much larger competitors on things like add words and PPC and all this kind of stuff. So I didn't know what to do. So I decided to try podcasting for business. I've been podcasting previously in a sports set up, I'd actually grown and sold to sports podcasting networks prior to setting up my business. So my intention was, I wonder if I can use the same principles of relationship building, networking, global networking in particular.

You know, I call it Napoleon Hill meets podcasting. You know, can I go and learned from all these really cool and impressive people and get a golden nugget from each of them and hopefully impart something on them? So it's a nice trade. But if I do that, you know every day of the week that I'm working. You know, imagine how much I've grown in twelve months time, for example. Very cool. I love that. I love that you kind of you're like me. You know, I could get it. We could spend a whole entire podcast on how many jobs I've had since I was a year. And yeah, wide the array with things that I've had jobs in. But yes, surveying to this it's always interesting. You Go back and you look at you know, where you got started, and you go, Oh, why did I do this? Some people even ask you like why did you do that job? They will that job. Let me to this and that led me to that and that let me see it people. I got asked on a podcast recently. Somebody said, if you could go back ten years and give yourself a piece of advice, what would it be? I said I wouldn't I just give myself a hug and leave it at that, because I'd been worried that I change something. And actually right. I love where we are now. I love kind of everything that we have right now and the fact that we're still growing and I look the people that we work with even more. I mean they're awesome, but I think overwhelmingly, when I look back, it's it may have seemed random at the time, but it it all kind of fits together, doesn't it all? Suddenly, at some point it clicks into place and it'll makes sense. Yeah, there's often time for me anyway, as like I'll remember that job I have when I was eighteen, in one thousand nine hundred and ninety three and some little click and I'll go I just use that thing that I learned from that guy, that trainer, and now I'm using today in two thousand and twenty in my job. And I wouldn't have been able to do that. If you know that particularly awesome for that, and so I think, I think it's you know, maybe sometimes you have regrets. Like I flip Burgers at McDonald's my very, very first job for about two you I didn't like that. Now learned a lot from it. So I didn't learn something from it and I, you know, got some free hamburgers. But yeah, I would, I would I do it again? No, if I didn't have to, but yeah, but well, it's because you got some free hamburgers, but unfortunately what you learned was not to eat that burgers. You know, I don't think. Maybe in the last thirty years. You know, it's I could probably kind of one hand. I many times of eating McDonald's. Just a saw too much. You don't want to go back. I can believe that you go back to so if you're just happen on the watching US talking with Phil Poluccia, who's known as the Tony Robbins for business podcasting, we're going to kind of pick his brain a little bit today about podcast and how we can monetize our podcasts and what that means and what that looks like. So that the first question we want to want to ask you, feel is, is how can podcasting enhance your business marketing? It's a good question in a whole variety of ways at all very positively. I think it's probably the important answer. So where do you get so? You obviously have the partner and collaboration side of things, which is when your networking with your guests and with people who shows that you're appearing on. You know, I like to see all of those things is as a great big opportunity. I'm either going to learn something or I'm going to learn something and make a great connection in somebody. So I definitely use it for that. But if you think about what the byproduct of that is, it's hours and hours worth of content which I can then use for my social media marketing. So now the amount of times I've had conversations with people and they say, you know, I don't know what to write for this blog. I need to say something on my social media but I don't know what to say. If you have a podcast, that problem disappears because you now have an abundance of content that you can use and repurpose over and over again. Plus it's an incredible way of introducing yourself to your customers. I mean people. By people we're all still trying to figure out how to be clever digitally and how to use the algorithms in our advantage, and I agree with all of those things, but ultimately it's to enhance the human to human relationship and podcasting is one of the greatest forms of storytelling that I know of that isn't overly polished, it isn't Airbrush, that isn't scripted, it's genuine, it's authentic and and it's real people having real global relationships, and I think that's why so many people love engaging with the podcast. So you know, I can speak from personal experience and from my customers that they have moved people so much further down the road to becoming a paying customer simply because of their podcast, because by the time they get on the phone to them, they already feel like they know you. So you said something there for a minute that I really want to going to go back on. You said people buy from people. Hmm, I believe you said. What are you whether? And I love that. I agree with that. Can I expand on that a little bit? which you mean how that relates to podcasts in the particular? Well, people buy people, you know, is that it's the relationship aspect of a sale. I mean, we've all we've all gone to a store or gone to buy something that we wanted and we haven't bought it because we didn't like the person selling it to us. We've all had that experience like this person's obnoxious, this persons do pushy, this person's in my face, like...

I'm not interested. But the opposite is true too. You've probably bought products that may not necessarily have been the best option in the market for you, but you kind of like the person or you like that woman's store. So you know you pay a bit exper and right. So it podcasting is incredible because it allows you to do that on mass and globally. Okay, so you know I use the phrase international credibility for domestic dominance. I use that all the time, and what I mean by that is if you even doesn't matter whether you have a really localized business. Let's say you're a mom and pop pizzeria in Chicago, right, and you're now competes against everybody else and that's it. You only do this one little area. Well, if you're seen on a podcast with all of the top Italian chefs from all around the world and from pizzerias and you're getting involved in global pizza, sharing recipes and, you know, bringing into your local store recipes from Sicily and recipes from all over the planet, because you'll see networking with these people. You go from being this small business that that may potentially be a disadvantage to actually, aren't your local community blessed to have you because you're so renowned and recognize for what you do, yet you only service them. That suddenly becomes a real unique selling point. You know, like your point about you know, sometimes you paid more, you buy some from somebody you maybe didn't need it, but you, like the salesperson whatever, like it. I have have a big sales background. You know, my very first effort job, I mentioned, when I was eighteen. Yeah, we're best buy, and was trained how to sell and how to do that sort of stuff and people by I dub great people all the times of stuffy didn't necessarily need but they liked me enough and I sold cars for a little while and I just come off of being a actually I just come off from being in the Vocational Ministry for about ten years and sold cars and I just like Hey, I'm not a salesman. I'm just a guy here transport my family and a former minister. Let's just help you find a car and I could sell anybody anything and I was a top cells and because they liked me, they trusted me, they got to know me through that process. And I think podcasting even depend on what the niches, and we'll talk a little bit what the best businesses are, you know in podcasting, our wet businesses when you work and podcasting later. But you depend on what kind of podcast you have. I mean maybe it's just you telling your story, talking about your daily life, maybe you're talking about your passion, whatever it is, or your hobby or something like that. People get the connection with you because it am and I think there's something about we talked about in live video a lot to like the number one. If you ask anybody alive video who's done this a lot, they'll say, what's the first thing you got to get right about live video? It's not the camera, it's not the lights, it's not the look, it's the audio every time, because people want to hear it, because they may put this another tab, they may be doing other things, and so people there's a connection when people can hear you think about podcasts. You I know for me, when I listen to podcast is typically the gym, Yep, you know, where I'm doing nothing else and that's in my head. You know, I'm just listening. I'm kind of zoned out and I get a connection to those people. Yeah, showed them listens and I think that's a really unique thing with podcasting, that that you don't get necessarily the video. You do get the facial side of it. You can see emotions and characteristics and stuff, but it's a little harder consumed video whereat as seeing. You know, you can literally be doing anything. Well, it's people, you know. You look at the three most common places that people do it, it's doing the housework, driving and the him right. So you can't watch videos whilst doing those things, not very easily anyway. So podcasting is exactly that. It's a form of media that could be consumed anywhere, anytime. It's a rapidly growing media and has been for a number of years. But at the moment, you know, it's I say as strongly as you know, if you're, you know, in this sort of early when somebody would have said to you know, just your business have a website, you know, and there was two people that said yes and there was the people that said no, we don't need one. Right. I feel that strongly about podcasting. If Your Business doesn't have a PODCAST, but you're spending money on other forms of marketing, it's like what are you doing? Because this is at the moment, this is one of the most fruitful forms of marketing that is still primarily organic. And you know, it's kind of like facebook was before they started to you mean, now you can't do anything on facebook without having a decent budget on there. You used to be able to win work organically on facebook just by using the groups and the content and the hashtags and stuff. You can't do that now. So podcasting is probably where facebook was five or six years ago. So it's like get in on it now, because if you don't and two or three of your competitors do, you've now got a hell of a lot of catching up to do. And there's always that thing about the people who come first, isn't that? The people who kind of a get the best spot, so to speak. Yeah, like the Joe Rogans out there. You Know Joe. It's massive hundred million dollar deal from spotify now just to publish as podcasts there and it's a to meet. No thing. That's excited someone else by going to ruin spotify, but as a podcast you're like, Oh heck yeah, there's a whole lot of people you're going to go. Okay, I'll listen to Joe, I'm done with...

...him, but now I'll listen to other stuff and they'll find things and there's a lot of stuff you can leverage there. So if you're just hopping on us all, come in here from Jennifer from Florida. Plush at you watching Jennifer. She's looking forward to hearing more on podcast. I'm here with a Bill Phil Polluccha, from billionaires and boxers, and we're not going to verify whether he has pants on or not. The mystery. Leave it up to your email. We don't want to be imagining my books has no, no, no, minor are I'll say min our orange, even though they're probably not. Yeah, so we're talking about how to make money with the podcast. We kind of cover the first one. First question on how I can enhance your business marketing. That the second question I want to want to ask you, feel is, is how can you become an authority by using podcasting. I love this question relatively easily with the right strategy, is the honest answer. So let me clarify this before I say I was. I'd like to say that I was dragged into coaching rather than kind of choosing to go and coach people how to do this. What it actually happened was I run a number of service based businesses. I needed a way of building these networks and building these relationships and and as a byproduct of that, started to get invited to go and do more keyno speaking gigs at top industry events and I got a book deal and a radio thing, and we went now interviewing actually the top people in the industry, and now we were working alongside them and doing collaborations of partnerships, and before I knew it, we were already at that top table. We were then being seen as an authority. The press would ring and ask for, you know, thought leader comment or an expert opinion on whatever it was they were talking about, and what I realized was that this was actually something that was replicable. You could teach other people how to do this, and that's what I love because, as a business owner, you know I've been. I was going through like a what I call roller coaster billing. Right one month it's like, yeah, making loads of money, I can retire, and then the next month is like I'm never going to win a client ever again. Like I don't know how I'm going to do that. So what this allowed me to do was break free of that. But I love being able to do the same for other people. So how do you become an influencer using podcasting? It's actually relatively simple. The strategy behind how to make it work isn't as simple, but the rule is pretty simple. Okay, it's the rule of perception. It's you need to level up and get to that next level. So let's take the analysy of if you were an influence in your industry, you'd be doing more keyno speaking engagement, right, okay. So what you do is you network with and podcast, interview and appear on their podcast of other keynote speakers that already speak at the events that you want to speak at and the event organizers of said events. That's it. Don't try and sell them anything, don't try and pitch them, just build a relationship. You're giving to them they're giving to you, and I promise you, the ones that resonate with you, that you're supposed to be working with, they'll come off anyway. They'll say, you know what, I love this person. You know, on the ones that don't, don't chase after them. That's done. You a favorite, your pass on aligned. Stay away from them. But that's how you become an influence using podcasting. You level up. You on networking. Yeah, I think. I think become that authority and less. I think. What's the word? It's a there's a book that Chris Brogan, who was actually our keynote speaker, for so I'm got all kinds of correlations. They therely Brogan with the social post summit, you twitteredition we're are in right now. He wrote a book all trust agents with with the author, and it's kind of one of those things like how can you give back to people? Exactly that. And you know, most people aren't paying to listen to your podcast now. They're from there are some, of course, podcasts at charge, but it's very small now, and so you're giving all this free information, you're interviewing people, you're maybe doing a I I've got friends who have a podcast called launcher, a live you Christian and in Jim and you know, they're just giving up free information on how did ye. But their goal ultimately it's okay, well, I've give, I've given, of given. Okay, what is this about? How can I go, you know, hire, yeah, for sure, to go do my thing. And so I think that's what you're saying. There is is find a way to give the people. Don't sell them anything. They did I remember learning seals is you never really sell. You asked for the sale towards the end maybe of a sells pitch. But you just tell them. How can you help them? Here to help you. I'm here to do this. Give, give, give, give, give. Eventually they're going to come around. I do think in podcasts, and I can make you an authority on whatever that subject is very much so, I mean. And so I used to see the podcast as what I was giving. So they were giving their time. I mean, I've teld you, you mentioned about people paying to list of podcast. More and more recently I've been seeing more companies charging guests to appear on their podcast because they're starting to realize how powerful it is as a marketing tool. So for all of you who are listening to this thinking I haven't even got started yet. There are already people moving on to that next level of you know, where you've kind of gone from the organic and now you starting to already get into the premiium. There are already podcasts out there that...

...you cannot appear on without paying them a guest for you. So hurry up, is my is as. There's my advice. But you know you're when you're saying about the becoming an authority and and them kind of giving value and giving back. It's exactly that. So it's a case of, you know, what I'm trying to get out of every conversation is I want to give something to you and I want to learn something from you. Right and then, if at the end and we get on, then we'll talk about doing business together. Most of my business working relationships start with the phrase I like you, we should do business together, and it's like, okay, so what is it your thinking? You know, you thinking our service businesses, or you think in the coach and like you think you mentorship. What are you thinking? And we approach it from that way rather than here's a product. Do you want to hey, do you want my service? Right. Yeah, do you think it's interesting? Like you know, Oh, you should put it on a t shirt. Yeah, Dude, for you. But yeah, so I think the hopefully whatever I got from that point here is is give back, and then people are going to come after you and hopefully you're you're giving a value where they're going to go to pay you to whatever it is that you're doing. Maybe to be a guest on their show. They'll pay you to be that happens as well. You tell my people paid to be on shows. People get paid to be on Shay. Yeah, especially big ones. Yeah, and even the interesting right now with all the covid stuff. And fill unfortunately had a very bad he got covid Ntil when I have probably a whole story we could probably talk fill something about before and suffered through. So we're glad you're doing really well now. Our better anyway now. But during covid right now, you have access to people as guests that you probably never had access to. Oh so true, because you've got nothing else to do. They're at home and they need an audience to get in front of. It's so you just make the ask and people are getting on podcast, like I've got my podcast or are my live show which I use as a podcast later? I'm already booked through. You know, all already booking in a quarter to two thousand and twenty one, because every now, everybody knows they're not going anywhere and they must have been an hour talking to me, because it's another audience that they can get in front of, and that's the whole idea of podcast, especially when you're doing an interview style like this, is just it's hey, maybe like ful phil maybe feel comes on to my show and there's more people who get he gets in front of it. They've never heard of billionaire and boxers and they could do a bus win. That's why I fills on the show. I would be on fiel show, and so that makes you they were an authority to a whole different market. Actually, that's not that's not entirely true. I don't we're oversubscribed at the minute. So actually that you would. That would give me a bit of a headache. However, I love kind of sharing the the message, because it's it's something that has such a profound and significant impact on my life that I actually love share. Mean, look, it's not like this is a secret, though. Since covid happened, there's been over two hundred thousand new business podcast created like now. Fortunately for you, only ten percent of podcasts ever make any money from it because they don't know what they're doing right and most people get to about ten episodes and quit because they haven't got to this vanity number in their mind of number of listeners or followers or whatever. So they quit and God, it's not working for me, and they start. What people don't realize is it's not this kind of magic pill where you just do a podcast and everything happens. It's what happens from those relationships. It's where those relationships can head. It's where the lessons that you can learn from interviewing the right people can help you get to the next level. It's having that stuff available there to share your voice and talk to your customers and engage with them better and understand who they are and for them to understand who you are. So it's all of this stuff in a great big melting pot and if you get it right, everything that comes from that is incredible. But so many people like they they'll have a strategy for the AD words. I'll have a strategy for their facebook campaign and for their SEO, but they'll just start podcast and there is there is no strategy behind how you're going to make it work right, you know? Is it the rights investment of time, which is why so many people will stop, because they will get to that point where they go, I'm just wasting my time, I could be doing other things. Exactly exactly. I think that, you know, to getting the ten, as he's it caps off. You see people get seven, eight, nine, and it is as like having open to give up and you got to keep going because that you got to build that authority. Got To give people time to find you, because they may find you six months after you do your first episode. s true, so you got to look for you. Kind of hitting on this next question. We're going to hop over to our ready's. I was glad you segued for me. Yeah, we go like a pro yeah, you like like you've done this before. Is it hard to monetize podcasting? And then the second part of that is, how do you do it, because most of US probably don't. I've never officially monetized a podcast personal because I've always worked for a company show part that does not have had that in my side, ones that were more I did. I did get some ads here and there. But so how is it hard to monetize and and what's the right way to go about it? No, it's not hard to monetize. It's it's like any form of Marxting. It's like, once you kind of know who your audience are and who that demographic is, you can partner with other people who are...

...also interested in speaking to those people. In fact, when we used to do a lot of our marking and sponsorship deals, advertising and sponsorship, yes, we wanted to give customers to them, but we also wanted them to give us listeners because we were selling to a very similar demographic. So I'll give an example of when we first at this. This is literally going back over ten years now. We had a sports podcast and we had is maybe like twelvezero listeners at this point, something like that, and it was like, okay, well, we're paying to do this. At this point it's almost like a semi expensive hobby that me and my friends, after the Games and after the sports matches, will kind of preview the show, will do a post reaction, will discuss it with the few days after we'll do any breaking news, big stories, all that kind of stuff, and I said, are you telling me that we don't know anybody who would be interested in talking to Twelvezero, predominantly men, AIDS, between the ages of eighteen and thirty five, with a disposable income that we know are interested in this sport? Like we seriously suggesting that? And it was like, Oh, actually, well, there's all these sports clinics because the vast majority of people who watch sports like to also play sports and as we get older we're not that fit. We get tennis elbow we we heard come back. Yeah, well, I will. I've done plenty of those. So we ended up getting sponsored by one of the largest sports physiotherapy and pry therapy centers because they were like the time, will do the deal. But at the same time they put our logo on their their trucks and on their buses going out because they wanted to get us more listeners, because the more people we could get engaging with both of our brands the better. So the answer is no. It's like it's once you have the strategy and your partner with the right people and you've got it set said the way you want to do it, it's not difficult to monetize at all. where it gets interesting is how you should monetize it, because there is the kind of the the very low hanging fruit. That the way I see it. But it's short lived and it's leaves a bit of a bitter taste sometimes in people's mouth. So it's the charging them to appear on your podcast. It's the you know, I've heard of this one as well, recording a podcast with somebody and then telling them afterwards as a charge and that they need to they can have a copy of it if you they pay you x amount and you'll break it up into social media chunks for them. Honestly, is ridiculous. You know, there's all kinds of stuff like that, and sponsors that just aren't relevant to people, or too many adverts where you just it turned into an advertising campaign. You just throwing stuff a people like everybody hates that. Stop doing it. So, yeah, those things really they grind my gears. That could be the new name for the show we could show. But yeah, yeah, absolutely, so they're. The way is not to do it the good ways, to do it right. You can approach this kind of moneytizing the podcast itself or monetizing what the podcast can do. Okay, so monetizing the podcast itself is very much about lining up with events. So I we make some of money on podcasting. We used to do it with events, like we find an industry event that was to do with whatever it was that we were trying to sell or talk to and we would do a deal with them where they would sponsor a podcast or a series of podcast and we will interview all of their keynoe speakers, because they're trying to sell tickets to their event, right, so they're driving all these people here, but at the same time we will pitch in. We'll tell you what, as well as doing the interviews beforehand, we will come and we'll interview keynote speakers on the day, will interview guests and get instant feedback on a podcast. So they were introducing us as their media and podcast partner to this an audience that we're trying to speak to. So the industry events is a is a big, big one. It's also other forms of media, radio, television and print. They're always looking for additional partners. You know the amount of authors that we work with from the likes of ink and forbs and these are the kind of contributor magazines where what they look at is, you know, we need to write stories, we need to write articles, we need to fight write things that people are interested in. So they do it based off our podcast interviews. We send them in interview, they'll do it, exchange with US and they'll write up. We listen to this. This was an interesting point. Here how it goes, which is how we get more media quotes. It's the same for us on our clients. So there's lots of ways of monetizing the podcast that way, even without being Joe Rogan and selling it for a hundred million or whatever it was. However, my favorite way of monetizing podcasts is monetizing what it does for you. So it's the relationships that you build. So it's the you know, I will make more money if I am the keynote speaker at, you know, six of the industry events that are huge in my industry this year. Okay, well, if you go and meet with all their keynote speakers and all their events organizers, the chances of you getting booked to speak or do a workshop at those things goes through the roof. If they've spent an hour to an hour and a half building a relationship with you on a podcast. Plus, going back to that point you said earlier, I've...

...already given to you by this point before you're giving anything to me, and most relationships these day start with people trying to take rather than give. Yeah, if you can give the amount of times that's led to a Oh, I'd love it if you could do this. We're still looking for Keyo speakers, you know. We're still looking for somebody to do a workshop, and that in turn can turn into money, because you are now attending the event as the thought leader in your industry and people are paying to come and listen to you speak. It works for a television, it works for radio, it works for clients, you know. So I did. It's a true story. I did a series of interviews and what I'm my plan was I'm going to intoe the top hundred CEOS of companies that I want to work with right and the idea behind that was I'm not going to sell them anything, I'm just going to learn from them. I'm going to have a great conversation and the ones who resonate with me are going to stick around, they're going to work together and the ones who don't are going to off they go. Okay. The honest thing that I thought was going to happen was I thought it was going to be more likely that I would end up interviewing sort of forty to fifty of these top one hundred CEOS, okay, and then I was going to use the credibility of those relationships to sell to the kind of teer too and tear three suppliers. That was what I thought was going to happen. What ended up happening was we ended up winning more of those top one hundred clients that we can handle and we've never actually worked with those two two or two three supplies. Now we've always worked with those businesses and that's that. That all came about because we just kind of built a relationship with people, and you can do that for yourself. You can do that for any business, provided your business requires you to build relationships with people. This will work for you. That's so many different ways to monitors and it's not that Yom you're going to say, be honest with you. Those I like the ideas there. I like because I think what most people, and I hate this, was like they'll do either a pre roll ad on their podcast or they'll start it out, and there's a couple in the marketing industry that I know. When the podcast starts. I just saw my you know, I use I use an APP called breaker to listen to podcast. Yeah, it's an ANDROID APP and I like it, but I can boom, boom, tap the thirty two forward twice and then I get into the show. There's another one that's like absolutely minutes of just hey, check it. Our partners at BLA, blah, blah, and I'm like, you know, and I know these are getting paid, but to do it. But it's like I don't want to who who's actually I mean, I guess enough for listening to it to make it valuable. But you know, maybe they're on the treadmill. They don't have time to click the that's what they're thinking. I think there's they're hoping that you're so engaged with whatever it is you're doing and you don't have a chance to fast forward, where I'm like no, boom, boom, oh no, it drives me crazy. Is Well, I mean one of the the worst ones for me is when people they retrospectively out advertising so they haven't actually had a break for it in the show or to say you know his so it kind of gets to like the end of a sentence, someone's just taking a breath and it goes through an advert and it's really sudden and then they come back. It is just a sudden and it's like II a learned to edit better. Will you know we leave a break? Just say now we're go have a message. Your a sponsor? Yeah, there's I know somebody one of our in our space that you know. He'll be talking. He's interviewing and also to just you know you it goes over, his voice is louder and it's different background sound and you're like, yeah, recorded that outside of this interview he's in. HMM, and it's so obvious. Like I said, you gotta you can edit it out. Maybe make that better. It's okay to advertise. I think it's nothing wrong. Yeah, do's not. Look what I say. Is it provided it? Everything you do on your podcast should be about adding value, right, and that includes who you choose as your advertisers and sponsors. So if that business is not adding value to the lives of your listeners, don't do it. Yeah, and that's that's key, I think, because people just to Oh, they're going to pay me x amount per episode, so I'm going to throw it in here and I don't really care. But you're a marketing you know. Let's say you're a marketing podcast and you're advertising some pizza place. Yeah, who cares, you know. And so, yeah, you got to make sure it's relevant and if it's so interruptive that it you know, it throws you off and makes me not want to listen. MMM maybe that's the wrong way to mind. Maybe there's better ways, like you're saying, of monetizing, you know, outside of the actual podcast itself, definitely, and making money elsewhere. That that seems to be the smart now you may start out with some ads, like I used to use an APP called speaker, and if you heard a speaker, yeah, and they let you put in, you know, you can get monetized and they put their own adds. You don't even control them. It's just like it's so bad and I'd go back and listen like what is this ad? This doesn't make any sense. So I finally I didn't leave it on very long because I didn't like it, but it was a way to make some money on the PODCAST, but it may be the wrong way, but yeah, but you're selling your integrity and your authenticity and that that there two of the most valuable assets that a you'll have, but definitely within podcasting. I mean the idea of not having control over who is advertising on my podcastt would keep me up at night. So yeah, yeah, that scares the life out of me.

So and actually the reality is, I know there's a lot of those sites out there and right and they're great for people that kind of just want to get started, but the reality is that if you build the relationships and you network with people, opportunities for sponsorship are going to come up anyway from people who've never even thought of this. They have a marketing team in a marketing budget, but podcastings new on that radar. But if they like you and they've had a conversation with you, I mean I've had plenty, and so up my clients of previous guests who have now become sponsors and contributors and customers, because that's kind of the point. It's like it's a global networking thing, like right, I. So let's use the example of, you know, I into somebody that I really resonate with and I think I really like this person, like this person gets me right. If I ask them. Listen, who else you know they could help me with this? Who else do you think I should bring onto the podcast? They going to introduce me to three or four of their friends who are similar states as to them, who I also really resonate with, because if I resonate with this person, I'm quite likely to resonate with their friends. But I do that every time I podcast. So every podcast interview turns into like three or four more interviews and they all with people that I resonate with. So it almost it almost becomes fascicle because it's kind of like, Oh, you know them and we know them and oh look, there's like fifty of us now, we all know each other. This is awesome and it's it's fascinating and it's a great way of doing business and it and it really gives you some cloud as especially as a small business, smaller medium sized enterprise. It gives you some serious clout to be able to say, you know, let's let's do this together, like let's do it, let's do a joint pitch, let's that's support each other's businesses. Let's you know. Yeah, you know. And even in like live video or podcast, sometimes you get people to approach your brand says, Hey, you know, I love what you're talking about, I love your style. Will you do a show for me and I'll pay you to be ambassador. That happens on podcast, happens on live video shows. Yep, then a lot of things. So there's always other ways to I think people think too quick and too short, like I've got to make that fifty cents per play or whatever, and you're not making any money off of it. It's as big deals down the road where that could be life changing for you. Definitely if you wait a little bit in like we said earlier, you build that authority, get people to know I can trust you, and they'll come around to it. I'm like a Jennifer says here, somebody to add my favorites. When they add and add that they actually use until as your experience with the product. Yeah, I think that's fine. Like, yeah, me to like product placeman. I will hear it in towards the end of this show I will advertise two products that I will use in the show and I'm using them. I show you them and yeah, I might get you a tiny little spiff or something if you go use it more like it's a credit. I don't actually getting thing a yeah, credit towards my account maybe, but I use them and so I don't mind talking about them and that's I think that can come in the play. I think it's a great point she makes there. Like definitely either is a product that you use and yeah, maybe you're in affiliate and that's okay. Maybe you're not, maybe you want to be an affiliate, but you talk about that and people trust you. Okay, they know you're using, you know, a yet you know I'm using a highlpr forty microphones. So if I want to give a review, talk about this and hi wants to pay me. You know, they know I use it every day and so that that's a that's a to me. That's an easier relationship than some weird software that they don't even know enough about to talk about the podcast. So I think that's definitely dress a good point too. Well, I've done similar for my customers and somebody did want for me. That were the kind of was was really nice to one of them was I mentioned that product on a show and I'm not an affiliate, and I remember joking on the show saying if you'll listening, you guys you know, message me and I'll give you the address and you can send the check. And the next thing I kind of this is about three or four weeks after the show is really I got a box turned up and it was like a box of like goodies and there's like some chocolates and bits and pieces and it was from the company to say we've actually had a few sales off than the mention on the podcast, to thank you for writ like they got's cool. And then I had another one where, quite recently a client of mine actually was I was listening back to this podcast and he was very complementary of me. He works in customer experience and he was talking about how I was the bill that he quite like looking forward to paying because he gets the most value from it and it's what it's changed for him, and I'm actually got into him lights. That pretty cool and I loved them for it. I was like this is amazing. He's he's doing my Marxing for me, like I don't need to say anything, I'm just gonna replay him. So mean that you know. I know in our industry especially, you know people that have used they'll say, hey, how man, we give you a free access to this and you know you're mentioning it. Definitely, I'm a cool my I was, you know, says me that x amount per month. I was paying for that, and that's a business. That's a way of monetizing it, but maybe not an actual you know check there. So I whant to move on to the next question. I know we don't have a lot of time. Yes, Bro Number four is and this is you know, this was a tough one answer, I think. But which businesses does podcasting work best for? Maybe maybe in the monetizing...

...side it is probably the best thing. They ass like what businesses tend to monetize and it maybe what business shouldn't even try a podcast or are you've been around. It didn't do too well. Maybe a podcast. Yeah, so I've done fifty different sectors now, so I've yet to find one that a podcast doesn't really work for. I've had some conversations where it's kind of been a bit like, hmm, really, like somebody who runs a fumal home, like they want to start a podcast and it was about breathement counseling. I thought that might actually be really nice, but I'm not quite sure how do how you partner with the right people for that market. But I I don't know what that looks like. Look for people with elderly parents? I don't know. So yeah, so there's been that. There was one that I always jokingly say like we took a brand from being kind of somewhere in the middle of their industry to being the number one go to brand for quickset concrete, and that was an interesting one because I really remember thinking, you know, how am I going to make concrete sexy? Like this is going to be a challenge. But what I realized was that all of their customers were trades people. So we did tales of the trade and we just did funny tradesmen stories, ringing in to give their stories and sharing funny things that happened to them on a job or interesting things or, you know, turning up to a job and there's like a Wendy Wendy House style roof there and you've got to try and get on this three story house and it's like, Yep, that's not happening. So that that worked really well for us. So it works particularly well for the fact it works pretty well for everybody. So it works well for for professional services companies and it works well for service is companies, because a lot of that is a lot of that is about buying a personality, isn't it? Like you don't choose an accountant based on their thirty second instagram post, you bet. You choose and accountant based on can they do the job? Do they work with other customers like me? Can they help me, all those kind of things. So podcasting is great for them because it gives them the opportunity to share their experience, in their knowledge and their advice. Very much as we said before, give something for free and people come back to you because they think this is what you're giving away for free. What do you what do I get when I pay you right, which is a big one. So professional services definitely SASS companies. Yes, absolutely, because you get to move away from talking about the specs, which is what seems to happen with all of your marketing stuff, and instead we can now talk to the custom about their user experience. What are you using this for? How is it helping you and your business or whatever it is, so SASS companies do well with it. Real estate does particularly well with it because you know people would say, well, how does real estate work? Because you know, sure you have to be able to see it, and it's like, HMM, like the amount of developments that have been sold off plan just by listening to the architect describe what it is they're going to do is unbelievable. You know, relationship realtor up a podcast about the market in loans and yeah, process and that your area and all them. There's so much you can do there. Yeah, well, let's say, let's take a demograph for example. So London, right, London sells a lot of properties to overseas and investors, particularly from China and from Russia. Okay, let's just say China, for example. Now, the London based realtors aren't going to try and sell the property to Chinese people. That's not how this is going to happen. They're not going to suddenly be trying to call Beijing and see what happens. What they're going to do is they're going to partner with an agency like them, of consultants and agents based in China, and they're going to have to do kind of a trade deal with them, but you have no idea how they behave on the other end of that phone. You have no idea how they represent your brand or how they show up. In many cases it's even white labeled because you own the development or you have exclusive rights to sell that development. So the relationship building that comes through podcasting is phenomenal because you can choose your partners by met working with the recross of the world. And you know the amount of times I've seen pros and cons here. I've seen people get that feeling where they go, this is somebody I want to work with. I get it, and I've seen the opposite where people have gone thank God I had that conversation, because I'd never work with them with their philosophy kind of being like this. Like I couldn't disagree more. So real estate works really well for I don't think there is one that doesn't doesn't work well. I said it earlier. You know, if your business requires you to build relationships with other people, podcasting will work for you right and I think you know, regardless of your kind of you if it's a continent play, which is really what it is. Yeah, contemplay. So don't just just like the live show, and I'm you know, I'm the part calling the kettle black here. But you know, take the live show and turn it in to something else. You know, you you repurpose the video to repurpose the audio show. Take a podcast and repurpose that, make it, make it a long form, you know, blog post with everything you say. You know the trains. Yeah, you can do that. So as the click of a button you can have...

...it done and it's seo kind of rich and that sort of stuff. So there's a lot more stuff you can do with the podcast. Love. You could be the like you were talking about, weird stuff and that sexy stuff like you know. I think of two people who've been very successful. Roger Wakeman, I think I said his name right. He's got the huge YouTube channel. He's a plumber in Texas. Yeah, it's cool. Love it. It's a boring subject, but he's done well. He's say, consistent. He's got a blog, probably a love it. That's always kind of stuff. And the other one would be Marcus Sheridan, who most people know more jared, and he owned a pool company selling pulls and pool supplies. Boring is all get out. In reality, not know. No one wants to spend the twenty Fivezero on a pool. But he started content, writing content, and then you know, videos and podcasts and all stuff. And so you can take anything, I think, and use it. You podcast, it could be your beginning are you could repurpose even a live show. If you don't want to, you, we'll talk here in our next thing is about how do you get started? Yeah, do a live show and then you take the podcast, the audio and uses the podcast. That's fine, very much so. I think there's a lot of you. Didn't matter who you are, just a matter of getting gone, and that's gonna be our next thing is. Yeah, question here is what's the first step? So I know I've listened to you. You're in your maxers be billionaires. Like what's the first thing I should do? What's the first step for anybody want to start a podcast? Okay, so the first place to start is with why. Why are you starting a podcast and who for? And then, once you figured that out, it's about what are you trying to give them, because you need to know those three things. Once you know those three things, it's all relatively simple from there. Okay, so the first part of that is working out your ideal customer Avatar, which you've likely already done for your business. Repurpose it for your podcast, but understand what it is that they want to listen to. What is it that they're engaging with? You know, don't reinvent the wheel here, is what I'm saying. Okay, if you're doing this for your business, you need to understand the kind of people who are going to be listening to this and what value you want to add to them. Now, that might be your customer, which that might be absolutely fine, but if you're looking to use this to build authority and influence rather than sales, your ideal customer might not be. Sorry, your idea audience might not be your customer. It might be your supplier or the partner or the person that you want to be working with or the person in that you aspire to be in your industry. That might be who you're trying to engage with more so, once you've understood that, everything kind of flows from there, doesn't it? Because then you can work out what kind of guests you want to be inviting onto the show. You can be working out what kind of platform. How long you know all of this information is already out there. Once you know who they are, okay, and then it's about having a strategy to say how many are you going to release, how often, whether they're going to be released, how long is the show going to be? Do you want to have sponsors? Do you want to have advertised as? At what point do you want to add that into your business? Think very carefully about that, because most people will just say yes straight away. I think it's actually a much bigger responsibility than that. As we said earlier, you know your audience has respected you with their time and they're follow so be very careful about trading that to a third party company, especially one coming back to the point that you said before, not when you don't know who they're advertising to write. That's pretty scary. But look, it's those steps. It's understand who it is. You want to speak to him, why, how it is you're going to add value to the moon. Who? which audience, sorry, which guests, are going to help you achieve that feet? Once you've done that, reverse engineer it. Okay, I want to do more keynot speaking gigs. So what kind of guests are need to get onto the show to do that? Where those shows. Who are they? When do they come up? When are they going to be selling tickets? And this is what I mean by having a strategy here. You can't just go into this blind and go today, I'm going to speak to this author. It doesn't work like that. You're planet based on you know, if Bob Procter has got an event coming up in three or four months time, speak to his people about doing an interview to help cell tickets for this event. You know, don't just go to him two months after the event, when he's in his downtime, and say, Hey, you fancy a podcast, because you will get two different answers depending on how and when you ask. So put yourself in their shoes, think about what it this that they're trying to achieve and sell it based on that. Hey, would you like to come on my show? I know that you're doing this big change at the moment. I've seen all the work that you're doing and I'd like you to introduce out to my customers. We have x amount of people that listen from here. Think it could be really good for you. What do you think? I haven't once mentioned me or what I'm getting out of it. Yeah, exactly. And I like the to the you know, asked us, you know this question, but you do you expect? The first thing you would say is get a microphone, get headphones, get this software your tongue. Now you first what I think is so crucial. Definitely where I think people get too caught up in this. Yeah, in the tech and all that. And how do I do this and how do I record and where do I host it? That's that's easy. MMM, it's the do I have a plan? What is the value? What's my in game? What do I want? You know, and six...

...months from now, a year from now, two years from now. So look, let's you took that angle on and let me write it this way. I made my first hundred and Fifty Tho bucks from podcasting. This is going back a very long time ago now, and I made it using a blue yet he mike, the Blue Ice Mike. It cost me about thirty bucks from like our version of craigslist, I suppose, and I bought up new pop filter to go over it and as I was getting out of the box I put my thumb through it, so you had a big hole in the pop shelter. And I literally use that same microphone on my kitchen counter, recording on my Mac book for a year and we comfortably made over a hundred fifty thousand dollars off that quite comfortably. And it was just this. It was just, you know, yes, it's improved as we've got on and we've started editing better and all this kind of stuff. But people, I find that people use that as an excuse. It's like, Oh, I don't know how to edit, so I can't do it's like, well, you know what, you know how to press record on zoom and have a conversation. So what's the difference? In fact, zoom is a great place to get started because it gives you both the video and the audio on its own. So it's already giving you a podcast. Just go edit that. It's going to take five minutes. Great. You know, in facebook's free. I mean you can, yeah, live and record and you know, yeah, you want a good go audio quality. But if you guys, start somewhere. You know, start what you got, but make sure you have a plan in place first. What your what's your point? What are you who going to talk to you? What's what's your episode's what's all that kind of stuff? How oft are you going to publish? You know, figure all that out in the tech and where you hosted and all that stuff. You'll you know, you can get bored with that really quick well, a great place to do that actually is, I always say to people before you start your own podcast, once you figure out who your audience and you kind of know who you want to talk to, go and start guest appearing on podcast already in that sector, because you'll get to meet people that are going to help you. The podcast community is really cool. We all ready look after each other and was a lot of referrals and recommendations. So you'll have a lot of good fun there. But you know now you're already talking to existing podcasters. It's like, Hey, what Mike you use? What do you suggest I use at this point? What do you used to host it? And you having conversations with existing podcasters. So that is no very it tent through that free microphone that comes on the headphones when you get your your new apple phone. You know, hold it away from your bid. It will do absolutely fine for the first act amount of episodes until you fancy spending literally no more than a hundred hundred fifty two hundred bucks on a on a microphone will give you something incredible for sure. And you know, and you know you mentioned getting you becoming a guest on show. There's a lot of sites out there nowadays and actually, the funny you mentioned that I'm gonna put in the comments. You and I met through we did match maker DOT FM, which is a bridge, and I I've used it a little bit and I'm now, right now, I'm seeing tons of these kind of sites right now pop up, especially their covid are are postcovid. Now people are trying to find podcast to be a guest on and you know, so there's people out there that either want you to be their guests or, like would love to be a guest on your show very much so. So sides like match maker out FN. There's a guest podcast directories. There's wildcast, I think is a new one that I've seen now. There's tons of a mouth, another one. Yeah, there's just a keep popping up left and right. So there's places, though, I think to get to fills. Point is there's places you can go find where they would love to have you as a guest because they're dying a heavy guess because a guess does something different for a podcast when it's just you talking all the time, you don't even a video show or on audio. HMM, you know, it's you people to now. But when the voice changes se you got a southerner in a you know, British guy, you know, on a podcast, that's a whole different stand for everybody, and so absolutely breaks up the monotonous and so there's a lot of stuff out there. So I well, actually it's also really powerful with the audience sharing stuff as well. So if you think about it, you know, you bring your audience, they bring theirs. They all go into this mountain part. If you know, it's like this. For example, I'm on here now, so I've got your audience listening and I've got my audience listening. If my audience enjoyed your questions in the way you do it, the next thing that they do is go and check out some more of your podcast and some more of your content and if they like you, they're gonna stick around the subscribe, and the same thing is going to happen with your listeners. Anybody who's thinks you know anyone of those thinks this guy makes sense. I'm going to go listen to some more of his stuff. Check out my interviews. If they if they still like me, have to listen to a couple of those. I got to follow on a subscribe and they now become a listening to my show. That's another great thing that comes with interviews, especially if you are strategic with it and you know who you're interviewing. Those, those tradeoffs can be really, really powerful, really part you wanted to bring value to your audience and you want to bring value to their audience. Were God absolutely like and there's always a way, especially in the marketing industry. It's always waited like we are social media lab but talking about podcasts and lines up with social media, even though it may not be social media per se, but it lines up and everybody's trying to...

...figure out podcasting in our industry. Even you have been around for a very long time still and figured it out. So I think there's ways always find that relationship. I agree with you. I think there should be a lot more collaboration and partnerships than the should be competitors, because you know, there the reality is that you know people think, Oh, I don't want to do that, I don't want to introduce you to my competitor because, you know what, if you like them better, and it's like, well, people like, we're going back in circles now, but people buy, people buy from people like, they buy from people that they like, and there will be people in your competitors audience, and I said in e quotations and your competitors audience, that would rather work with you and there will be people in your audience that, shock horror, would rather work with them. So you doing a joint piece of content together actually shows to the customer we are aligned in this. Our job is about giving you the best possible service and it doesn't matter to me if that's him or with its us, because it's going to balance itself out in the end and ultimately, in those relationships the customer winner. Still feel like I appreciate you being on the show. Where's where's the best place that you like to send people over to? The kind of check you out? Oh cool, thank you. Yeah, definitely go and check us out at billionaires in boxerscom. I also have a really unusual sounding surname. So if you search for Phil Polucer, which is you, go on screen pel you see h a for any of you listening on podcast. Go and search me on Google. You will find all of my social media profiles and say hi whichever way, for you feel most comfortably.

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