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Episode · 2 years ago

How to Start a Successful YouTube Channel: An Owen Video Interview

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Struggling to get started on YouTube? Or maybe you're stuck and don't know what to post or who to grow your YouTube channel?

Owen Video sat down with Scott Ayres to discuss how he helps clients succeed on YouTube with a very simple formula called the "4 P's"

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Wealth Social Media Lab live podcast. I am Scott Ares, the content scientists here at the social media lab or. We Bust the myth rumors and the stories of social media marketing with science and this podcast that these are the audio portion of live video interviews that I've done with guests on my social media lab live show with Agora pulls. We've taken out most of the commenting with the audience as much as we can in these episode. You can read the episodes, you can watch them if you go over to social media lab dot live. That's social media lab dot live and this interview. This is interview with my old buddy Owen video, who used to be the cohost of social media lab live, and we go all through different ways for you as a business to really crush it on Youtube and become successful. So I hope you got your notepad ready and you're ready to listen to interview from own because it gives us all kinds of good stuff. Remember, if you want to go watch it later and get some of the visuals that we talked about, go to social media lab dot live. All right, we're going to bring all went on. I don't feel like I have to give much introduction, to be honest with you, because if you don't know one is you haven't really paid much attention in the social media space. And there he owned was asleep. Oh, wake up, wake up, Owen, time to be on the show. Yeah, you do. You have finished eating your carrot cake, because I saw that the best. If you haven't, you have to go over Owen stories. He said carrot cake is the best cake. I'm curious saying the comments. Yes or no, carrot cake. I'm curious to see. So. So, how you did in man? How how's life been the last couple of months? Life has been, you know, really incredible. It's obviously a really challenging time, but it's been, you know, this great season of really finding out who we are, finding out what we stand for and really calling our audience to stand up and be counted. This is a season for leaders and for leadership, and this is a time for leaders to rise up and to say hey, I'm here and I'm here to impact the culture, I'm here to impact my business, and that's what we're seeing. We're seeing a lot of people rise up. They want to get onto youtube because traditional social media has found its limits. They've reached the CAP. They can't get out of that bubble and Youtube is the pathway to a global audience, and so we are well positioned for that and our business is humming along and even growing. So we're very excited. So so how did you, and I know the story someone, but okay, somebody maybe. What is your like your elevator pitch of how you got into Youtube video or video in general? What does that look like for you? Yeah, so, for those of you that don't know who, I am on a youtube channel coach, and what I do is I help business in industry, thought leaders, grow and launch a channel on YouTube. I got into Youtube when I was, Jeez, what, nine years old? It was back in the early S, believe it or not, when I got into Youtube, and I know that sounds crazy, but we grew up a poor family in the suburbs of Los Angeles and we had to Christmas presents one year a Nintendo and a video camera, and I played with the Nintendo for about fifteen minutes, but I played with the video camera for about fifteen years. Everywhere I went I had a video camera in my hand and I was doing these stop motion, you know, Lego animations. I would do sort of like these Barbie doll dramas with my little sisters and I was I was at I did sketch. I did sketch comedy in high school I was in a sketch comedy group called the Pen Taveret, which is actually a reference from so I married an axe murderer, which goes into sort of like my love for for, you know, cult movies and sort of underground, under the radar movies. And you have always worked with a camera and I've been in sales for I was in sales for a long time and after, you know, being fired...

...twenty two times, Scott, I mean I've In't fired from every job I've ever had, any traditional clock in, clock out job, I've been terminating from that job. And so when I lost my last job I was the number one salesperson at the company and I recognize, Hey, if right, if I can be the number one sales person in the company and still get let go for personality differences or whatever. You know, Boston I just didn't get along. It was just theod that was the end of it. Yeah, and and I thought, you know, I'm need to give my hand at at Youtube and do what I really love. Like, if I'm gonna get fired and be broke anyway, I might as will be broke doing the thing that I love to do, and that's video and that's creating funny videos, it's creating shows, and right youtube offered me the opportunity to do that. So now I build my own show on Youtube, but I also help other business leaders build their shows on Youtube as well. And George says he would totally fire you. So smart man, you're a smart man, proudly unemployable from. Yeah, I can relate to that. Like I was thinking today, like some reason I got this thought about, you know, talking about my past and stuff, maybe some videos. You know, I'm forty five and since I was sixteen I've probably had like thirty five jobs and you know, most of the last two and the longest tenure I've ever had. But yeah, fired from a lot of them. Are just left abruptly and made pivots and changes. I think that you would. You definitely have to do. What was that last job, by the way, where you should even one a radio station? I was working at a radio station and you know, it's really ironic, right, because the my experience at the radio station changed my life for video station and through the influence of the people there that I met my wife, Theresa. Okay, so really important. That was very much a divine, I think, a point no two to be at that radio. However, while I was there, my job was to sell clients advertising space and sell them airtime. We're all familiar with you'd. But the the thing was, as I wanted to produce their commercials, I will, I would go into these business owners like I went into a painter, a painting company, with a whole campaign idea for him. Is that what I wanted to on the radio. And there was this very small Internet component to it. You know, they had like Internet streaming radio, and so before the Internet streaming, the would be like a five second preroll. And so I had made ideas. I actually made jift videos. That's right, gift videos. No, is it what? Ten? All right, is it hard? You our soft g I'll tell us in the comments. I'm a hard G guy, by the way. Sorry, are you your a jift guy? Is that what hard to gift? I'm gifts, Oh, GIF okay, all right. So I go with what the creator of the Jif said, which is the the jift peanut butter way so and it's but here's the thing is, so I would make these sort of like looping I was very, very I wanted to produce shows, I wanted to make content the car. Stop Making Radio or stop making radio ADS. We want you to just sell and leave the client alone. And I'm like, how do you sell and leave the client one? How do you say hey, spend twenty three thousand dollars with me and then you know you're never going to talk. I'm never going to talk to you again. That's what the company wanted and I kept telling them no, no, no, like that's I'm a campaign manager and I can sell when I take a campaign to the company. And so I had all of these grandiose ideas to take our clients and and have them on radio and on the intergrate, these sort of like interactive campaigns where they hear us on the Internet radio side, but then they have like enter a code into the clients website, you know. So it's very interactive. was very forward thinking. I was terminated shortly thereafter, and it was all even though I'd number one sales that it was all very much like this is not how we do things. Your performance as well, but they were like your personality is not a good figure. And I'll tell you, I walked out of that office. I was just I was very embarrassed, you know, because I here I am, I thought I was, you know, and I thought it was all. So I'm walking out with my box and my plants sticking out of the box, you know, and I'm thinking I'm going to do Youtube and I'm going to show these guys that thing or two. Okay, and the the the best. I think one of the best moments of my social media and online career was speaking at Social Media...

Marketing World, speaking at Social Media Marketing World and the same company that terminated me was sitting in my presentation learning video marketing from me, and it was a different group of people, so they didn't know who I was. But I'll tell you, that was a moment where I was like yes, yeah, you know, and it was really, really cool. That's pretty fun. I've had some of those Aha moments, like I remember a job I was at that I walked away from it because of chaos and stuff and the head manager and I didn't get along and then now, years later, he's one of my closest friends and comes to me all the time asking me marketing tips and stuff. So it's really funny because he owns a restaurant now. I used to run a franchise restaurant for him. So how kind of funny now is it comes yeah, my past is very crazy. Was talked about it one day speaking a pass I mean you and I did this show for like what fifteen months now? We did show together. I'm I'll tell you, that was a glorious run at we we had a great time on that show. We set records, we did things nobody else had ever done. Oh now we're seeing tons of live streamers, you know, adopt what we introduced and that is so cool. It is so cool to see people that have never met me talking about an Ros. It exactly cool, you know, to see that kind of impact on the the community. And so, yeah, we did it. We did a great show together. Yeah, it was a lot of fun and, you know, just be this wade. Life happens sometimes. We had to make a pivot and change and I think it's been good for both of us to kind of up our games a little bit individually. Outside of you know, I'm having to produce the show now, which never had to do. It's so which is a lot harder to do. Every good you do on your own. You're constantly looking, like I was telling someone that is like I got to figure out my camera now because I have to look this way to look at the camera. So otherwise I'm looking down doing this, look at the comments, and so it's all it's a balance act to figure something out, but I do think in the long run we'll both do a lot with and have fun with the differences. And I've learned a lot how to edit video now and graphics better. I'm making our thumbnails, you know kinds of things. So yeah, it's been been a good time to do that. But yeah, we want work to we're going to talk about some things about video and the first thing that we're going to talk about once ever, your Owen's Owen's probably trying to get some copy, some bagels posing. I'm over here literally posing for a picture. My wife is staring at me, not taking a picture, like what? What, and I'm like tank, maybe love that, don't you love that? Yeah, she's right here, come over here. They're all they always try to not be on camera, but it's the area is my wife. We're trying to capture more of our content. Right. Everyone's always so afraid of like stepping into the camera. I'm like, dude, it's Scott Ers like. It's like it's like it's alive video. It's not seeing in. I mean it's okay, I mean it's yeah, it's not that big of a deal. But see, we are going to talk about some things about video and owing the yeah, good. The first thing that that you you mentioned it. You want to talk we got five different points we're kind of going to walk through here. The first thing you talked about and want to talk about it is people are doing youtube wrong. What do you mean by that? Yeah, on Youtube, the common knowledge is to optimize your video for ECO keywords. Okay, and this is a false gospel. This is the wrong strategy and there's a lot of reasons why, and I'm going to share them with you right now. But you should be optimizing your video for watch time. And this is a big confusion because at the higher levels of Youtube, in terms of the people that make the Creator Book, the people that make the Youtube Algorithm, or they work on the Youtube Algorithm. You know, SEO is a thing it's definitely one spoke in the wheel of a video, but it's not everything. You've got to be optimizing your video to be watched by humans, because if you're optimizing your video for Meta date, and let's say that you rank for something like how to grow a youtube channel in two thousand and twenty, maybe you rank for that video for a time until every other new person I started to make that same video title.

But when you make that that video, if the video is boring or doll or drive, it won't rank very long. Your Watch time will tank, and watch time is everything. And so at the highest levels of Youtube, when we talk about you need to optimize your video, you know sort of the people, the boots on the ground. They hear optimize and they think, oh, I got to add more magic keywords to my video. That's not the case at all. When we talk about optimize, we talk about making your video watchable. How do you attract more of your from a cold market? How do you keep them watching beyond the first sixty seconds? Once they're watching, how do you how do you get them to the mind body connection? This is engagement, this is typing into the comment section. It's clicking like it's clicking share. Now, I don't believe in asking for all of those engagement signals in one video, but my point is is that you need to be optimizing your video, thinking about is it would even watch this video beyond the two minute bar right and that's what we need to be thinking about. So when we teach youtube, we talk about how to make your content interesting and engaging and exciting for viewers and more than just a video encyclopedia or video video dictionary, like how did to x, Y and Z. First, that one first step to we teach how to build a show around your content, and that's what people want. Think about that show. The profit. You ever watch the Prophets Goddard? You seen it where every I think it lost a little bit when it first came out. Yet okay, so the profit is with Marcus lamote. It's one of my favorite TV shows, and you know he comes out there and he saves companies, but he doesn't come out everybody. Today I'm going to show you how to save a dying candy business. Step one, review the business. Step to look at their PNLS. Now he doesn't do that. What he does is, he said, he just goes out and saves the business and he shows you the story around that. So we teach a process called the Ros and how to take your content and maybe it is boring, maybe it is like you know how to how to maximize your storage space on dropbox. Maybe it's not. Well, we show you how to turn that into an exciting story and how to create workflows that you can do that every single time. Yeah, and I you know, it's funny. You mentioned Ros earlier. I I'm I'm still using the Ros that we use in the show nice like that. Create a new one every week and I've got it pulled up right now. Is Oh and Ros and I've got our talking points, I've got our links to my guest link is in there, the length of the post. All those things are in there, I think. And even deb Mitchell, who's our community manager, who was she's adding, she's she's given us the rundown as you as we speak. We love on Jad does that in the comments. It's great. You know she's using an Ros for not the same one, but using RS for our new agency chat. That she's twitter chat. That she's doing. So there's awesome. There's something to that workflow that that's super super important. I think people missed out on the they just go all right, well, I'm gonna do a show. Like I've been guessed on shows where you're like, what are we talking about? I don't know what to talk I've actually been guested, okay, yeah, yeah, where they say let's just talk and I always makes me skeptical. I've also been Shan shows where they prepped me for one thing and then ended up going in an entirely different direction, which I wasn't not that I was not prepared to go in that direction, and so like I'm all of a sudden like wit, what content are we talking about here? You know, and leaves a bad experience with the ROS is. It's a run of show and it's a framework. It's a skeletal system, like like the wood part of a house, right, and it forms the the the vague shape of a house. But what you do is you add your personality and expertise onto that structure and really make it your own house. The the framework is there to help you say things at the right time and in the right order, as is proven by psychology. See, people don't really understand that video is communication, it is psychology. There are psychological factors at play. For example, when a person is watching me and I can't hear them, they're making eye contact with me and...

I'm developing relationship, you know, through them that way, but but I don't, I can't see them. We call that a pair of social relationship. It's a one way relationship where the viewer, and really it's more old to pull viewers, are all looking at one person or developing whelationship with one person in the same way. This is the power of media. So, you know, with with live video and youtube being accessible to sort of everybody nowadays, the thinking is, oh well, I'll just kind of take my blog format and read that on camera or say that on camera. Well, that's that's no good, because you know your blog. The first you know, five hundred words of your blog is just like really, it's an introductory overview, keywords stuff like that's not how people want video. Similarly, they're taking sort of the live video hey format trying to make a business out of that. Right, right. Television, podcasting and Youtube already give us a format to follow. They already give us the framework and and you know, I don't worry wish this on anybody, but I had cancer and I was going through chemeout there before a year, and during that your I sat and watched youtube videos and I unpacked the formula for successful Youtube Video, both viral style comedy videos, which not is not very common, but more for like the talking head edutainment style videos. We've developed two or three really good formats for those shows and we teach them to our clients. In fact, if you want to get our Ros format, you can just go to my instagram at Owen video, and comment video on my most recent post and I'll reach out to you and I'll send it to you because I want you to have it because I want you to make better youtube videos at the end of the day. Yeah, and I think you know you've mentioned like the how to stuff. That's typically I mentioned. We started like that's where I use youtube for, is how to think because I'm trying to figure things out. I'm not really, I don't. I don't use youtube a disappoint for entertainment or you know much would usually says the how to stuff. But you got guys. You can do how to stuff and still do it in the show format. You can still do it, make it funny. Of Roger Wakefielder courses, the poster boy, you know, of this stuff. He's a plumber who's got these guys shows and great videos, the plumber on Youtube. Oh Yeah, sure. And so you can do fun stuff and still have a format and people get used to that format, just like our show here. You know, we've stuck to a similar format the entire time because we want to get people used to then they come back to it, they want to watch it, they know it's going to go on. So I think that's aldim important. So we're going to talk about did this one started? I guess it's actually the five pieces. As we said, people are doing youtube wrong. But we're going to talk about a couple of things that deal with peas and not you appease you eat, or the yellow snow kind. Thank you. Thank you for classing it up, Scott are said. Yeah, you know, you know we're doing. We're keeping it real right, keeping it really hot. All right, so we talked about little how how people are doing youtube wrong. Now let's talk about how to do it right. So, yeah, let's talk about first, programming. What do we want to talk about it comes to program yeah, okay, so let's take sort of a step up. There are four disciplines to youtube and if you can master these four disciplines, these for Youtube workflows, then you'll master the art of Youtube. Okay. And it doesn't matter how dry and dull your content is. Similarly, it doesn't matter how wild and crazy your content. To See, I don't have an introvert boring content. Problem I have is owing to loud and to in your face, and so I've actually had to use these disciplines to tone down my character a little so that I can appeal to a wider range of people. Some people say too much and I've had to tone it down and I've done that using these four disciplines. And so the four discipline programming, production, promotion and progress. And if you follow those four disciplines you'll be a video pro. Programming, production, promotion and probe okay. So the programming, programming, is your content strategy. And if you're unfamiliar with the term programming, think of it like your grandmother might say,...

...a television program right, or we church. You know, they give you. A program well, the program is the program right. It's the agenda, it's the run of show, it's the video titles, that you're going to be making, but it's also how you deliver the contents in those videos. So it's really a two part process. And so when you start on Youtube, you got to think about what your boundaries are. You know, think of it like a tabletop, okay, and you're building a table where your your and is the up of the table, but your brand is built on these four pillars. What are those pillars? Right? So if you're a social media manager and you're going to start a youtube channel to get clients that will hire you for social media, then your table is going to be something like social media management, but it might even be something more specific, like like facebook and intanm management. Okay, it might need to be more specific, like facebook ads management, but that's gonna be the table. Okay, the big overlying picture of your channel. And then what are the four legs? What are the four pillars of that content? Let's give an example. I see that jess the O'Donnell is watching full Po and she works over at Text Smith. Text myth makes phenomenal editing and video editing. CANTASIA's one of my favorites. Yeah, so let's say that cantasia were to start a youtube channel, which would probably be a really good idea. That tabletop would be editing video. Okay. So what are the four pillars of editing video? Well, I think one pillar would be the camptasia software, right, the camptasia software as a whole, and tutorials and videos and things of that anchor. And that's one pillar of the leg. Now the other thing might be the other part of that might be editing workflows and how to set up templates and how to how to find, you know, how to get it, make everything easily duplicable. Another part of that might be creating a templates. I know can't. Asia has a bunch of templates. And so you know, you build off of these four pillars and over time your tabletop can develop ten, well, fifteen, pillars, but you build one at a times that you build a solid foundation that if anybody could look at one of or if anyone saw four videos in eight it one video in each leg, they would go, Oh, this social media manager, or Oh, this is a youtube manager or oh, this is a video editing software. Okay, so that's your programming circle and you've got to be really dialed in because the biggest mistake that I see people making is that they talk about whatever is interesting to them. So I'm real social media manager, but today I'm going to talk about trump, and if people could hear my thoughts about trump and blah bla, blah, Blah Blah. It's not true. It's not true. And I understand that there's times and places to like stand up for an issue, and those are like exceptions, not the rule. The rule is you stay within your framework. And big tip. If you really want to go next level and and you've got let's say you've got a a social media management channel and you want to talk about trump, well then what I would do is take a newsworthy trump headline and apply. It's a social media so maybe you're going to take something like, you know, trump tweets X. Yeah, like how, like social media manager responds to trump's tweet, right, and maybe you do a whole series where you respond to trump's tweet Elon must tweet and these and and you comment on the mental social media manager. That type of programming can do really well. When you attach your content to a viral or a national event, well, that would be like a fulltime job. Replied Vin MC videos. For those tweets constantly. You've better as a great idea, though, but so I mean in the programming side of this. And I know you've had some public conversations and when I've seen privates conversations. What's thirteen? What you have seen private conversations? Yeah, that's said. That funny. Sorry, keep it it. Yeah, we're keeping a classic keyber have. Yeah, waits start up with anchor man,...

...anchorman reason, you know, references and Ron Burgny so on that. But the role of SEO, you gotta you show you have been on the camp of seos a little bit. Not as important, or some feel like it's ultra important. Where do you see Seo for the most channels today? Yeah, absolutely. You know s seo is salt and pepper on your videos. Okay, but SEO search engine optimization on Youtube will not get you the results that you're foreign. There's a couple of reasons for that. Number one, there are never enough people at one time searching for that Niche Keyword to give your channel velocity. That's momentum, and Youtube is all about momentum. When you hit the work when you hit the published button, Youtube is looking for how many views that you can get in a short amount of time, in a forty eight hour, seven day time past fan. So if SEO is your strategy, it's a sit and weight strategy. It. It's up. Let's publish this and wait for people to search at home, Dodome, do dog. Now, after a year or two do you may have accumulated enough watch time to give your channel momentum. The problem is it took you a year or two. So if you're a business or an industry thought leader or somebody who needs to make money doing this, than Seo is going to be a bad strategy for you. The other part of Steo is this is this highly deceptive. You know, anybody can say any any youtube expert can say, Hey, you know, you should rank for the term social media managers with one leg and Cincinnati, and you'll rank doc, you'll totally rank bro you know, and you will. You'll rank within five seconds because nobody is searching for it. But here's the thing. It's a softball win and so people get distracted by that and they go, Oh, I rank for this term or or they rank for that term when they're logged in as themselves. Right, it doesn't work that way. So you know, seo is a strategy that you want to use like salt and pepper. You use it to season the videos that you're in. Similarly, we use SEO, for example, to discover what trending topics we might be able to connect to our content. So my content is, you know, Youtube tips and tricks, like growing your youtube forty. That's the tabletop that I'm building on Youtube. Now when I go and I do my keyword research, I'm not really looking for like youtube tips, because it's all the same tip. It's how to get more of us, how to get more subscribers? Right. What I'm looking for is I'm looking for trending topics that I can connect to my business, like youtubers that explode out of nowhere. Right, that's a good topic, right, how to get more views, like Jim Jones did. Right. Similarly, it's sort of like, you know, how I would manage Donald Trump's social media? Right, that's going to be that's why we would use keyword research, is to find what's trending on Youtube and then look for creative ways to connect our content to it. And this is not going to be like a regular ongoing thing. This would be sort of like a when it comes around type of thing, right, you want to be ready to produce that kite set that type of content, and so we tell our clients and sort of steer clear from Seo. Use It as seasoning. When you come up with a good video on a good topic, let's go see if there's a better word to use. But we're not going to base the video around what somebody else is is searching for right now. And there's two reasons for that. Number one is that SEO keywords, like everybody does that. Yeah, so if you're like you know, I'm Owen video on this big time Youtube, you know, social industry, people know me, kind of thing, and I'm doing the same videos some brand new unemployed youtuber in his garage now, absolutely not. If you're a thought leader, you need to do thought leadership content. Thought leaders don't go to the polls and say how should I lead today? Right, thought leaders say this is the content you need to know, and we make that content. We use keywords to frame the title in such a way that it appeals to a human being but might also...

...trigger some youtube search content. Now, perfect example of that is we just had a client who teaches youtube for real estate agents. She's a client of ours. She's doubled her subscribers twice and she started with us. That's within a, you know, a ninety, two hundred and twenty day period. And what what she her last video? Her most recent video has like zero keywords in it. There might be one or two quick little things at the end then, but it's like how to three extra views with the newsletter for realty agents. Right, it's not a big it wasn't optimized for no one certain. Yeah, but her search traffic, she's getting search traffic from it because Youtube understands what her video is about and they're putting it next to the videos. Yeah, that that are using similar keywords. That's so that don't need everything recommended. It's so right. Yeah, yeah, you don't even really need to use keywords if you're using good context. This is name work. Is it the same realtory you mentioned in your talk at Social Media Marking World? Yeah, yeah, talking about that in your speech. So, yeah, all right, that's that's cool to see she's increase that. So we've talked about programming and what I CEO is like and there's a lot there. I mean, you just set up a show, you can't just decide to do it tomorrow and go. You gotta put some preparation into it. kind of know what you're doing and it kind of stick to the pattern. So so, once you've figured out your programming, the next step it is going to be, you know, production. Yeah, and and so what kind of tips can you give is on production that don't like break the bank or like break your back? Yeah, I know you do here. Yeah, I think that with production, you know, you're looking to create the best possible video in the shortest amount of time. Now, when I say that to clients, a lot of times what they hear is the shortest amount of time. And you will not have success on Youtube by spending zero time and prep and then outsourcing into an editor. You're going to create a whole bunch of garbage videos right that way, right. And so, you know, I run into this issue with thought leaders because I'd sell my clients are big. They already have a big podcast. They are they have four locations, you know, and they want to start that coming out. And so they're used to outsourcing everything. They're used to like having a guy run that store and having a girl run that man at that social thing and with your videos. This is where you are literally taking your brain and documenting it on like the record of history, and so you need to sort of take all the outsourcing that you're doing is so you can spend a little bit of extra time on your videos. And so in the in the programming phase, that's where we have the thought leader sort of brain dump the bullet points and and sort of the themes that they want to cover in the video. In production now we're moving to a production workflow where you're filming, editing the video, getting a thumbnail made. Okay, so filming, editing and thumbnail. That's what's happening in the production phase. So when you're filming, you want to be in a place where you can sit down in front of a camera, where your set is already constructed and you're good to go. That might just be your work desk at home with the bookshelf behind you and a door with a light switch on it. You might mean all that door look so unprofessional. You're thinking the wrong thoughts. Okay, it like it doesn't matter what your set is. I'm Owen Video, right, so I've been building my set for quite some time. I think Scott you've seen just in the course of a girl pulse we switch locations twice and we had multiple different setups. Right. I'm not about to change mind completely here in the next couple months as well. So, yeah, you got it. Up Your game as you keep going, but yeah, up your game as you go right. So it might start in your in your in your in your closet, even right, like Peggy Hill. Right, Peggy Hill actually had her all her office in the water. Hot Water Heater was behind her, you know. But I'll tell you. There's tons of things that you can do to make your set look a little better, and we could talk about that. But...

...you get you got to have a place where you can sit down and film. Then you need to use software like Camptasia or like be live, where you could press one button and go right. Be Live has an offline recording feature, so you could use that. Cantasia has an ability to record your screen and record a camera, so you could be looking in your Webcam while it's recording your screen at the same time. Right. So you need to be in a place that you have a video creation station and so you've got these videos prepped in prettage, like I'm to make these ten videos over the next three months. Okay, and now you have a station where you can sit down, looked at the title right and go all right, so I'm doing this video today and I'm going to follow Owen's great video formula, which is, you know, great, and then I'm going to get my video on camera, I'm going to edit that video according to the great formula and then I'm going to create a thumbnail for that video that people can click on, because every single view on Youtube was first a thumbnail that had to be clicked right, right, very, very important. That's it. That's it. I mean where I mean what are we're are some good tools to create thumbnails that you use. I use a lot. People use CANVA. Everybody knows CANVA. I would think it was great. We are closing. We have like a seventeen point nine percent click through rate on canva right now. So I'm like, I have always been a professional editor type of guy and online tools like canvo sort of kind of rub me the wrong way. But I gotta tell you, since working with Canada and apply what we got can the pro first of all for ten years, and now we can remove backgrounds and add strokes and do some different things. Wow, seventeen point nine percent, so can by. I think is a great tool. Even the free version is a great tool as you get started. But when you make a thumbnail you need to follow like a thumbnail template. We've got videos about this on our channel. But it's like four basic things, right. It's a background, like what you know, what's fin is it? Is it blue, or are you in the forest? Like you need to buy aground. You need a picture of you with removed from the background so that you can scale it and shrink it and do different things. You need some text on their right. You need less than three words text. That's how little text you should be using. And then you need some supporting imagery, like an icon or a graphic or something additional that you can, you know, add to that video. So it's it's your face and another face or an Emoji or a thumbs up or something that says, you know, hey, this is what this video is about. So following having a thumbnail template and then augmenting that template for each new videos the best way to go. You're bite your thumbnail. Your very first thumbnail should take you like an hour here. Everyone after that would take you like fifteen minutes. Yeah, and I'm using I pulled a thumbnail for this show. This episode. We're doing not. What I've been doing is I started creating our our thumbnails. I use thumb blaster, I think it's what it's calls from black your sweets. I got on I got a lifetime access to it for like forty bucks like six months ago. As I've been playing around it, and they can do a lot of this, because I'm not a photo I'm a I'm an image creator editor. But you can add the shadows, you can do all kinds of stuff on the images. Like I can take images of a picture of someone and go to remove background. This all Google remove background. You can pull out your background. So you don't even pay for that. And what I've been doing lately we we're putting a gore pulse logo consistently on them, just so for the branding purposes. And even notice it's the same background that we're using as I use the background here in the show. I think it's really good and I don't really did. It creates brand great piliarity and this is why structure is so important. But I talked about the great structure. We have multiple different structures depending on the type of video that you want to do. A talking head video where you're talking about business. Great is the best way to move forward. And if you guys want a copy of that, you want to access to my new software that'll spit out a script for you. Go to my instagram, click on type the word video in the most recent post and I'll send it to you. But structure is so important because it creates familiarity with your with your viewer. You know, and and this is...

...the problem with most people's videos, is their wing in it or there. They're kind of doing it slightly differently in every single video, and that's why we call these youtube disciplines, because there are times when you implement innovation and time for you have to like not implement innovation. So, for example, you know, I would want you to create a structure based on the great formula. And when I say structure, we're talking about formatting or storyboarding. We're talking about what you say in your video, when you say it and what appears on screen when you do okay, so that's that's what structure is, and you follow that structure each and every time to create familiarity even when you have new ideas that you think would be really cool, implement that new idea after the first ten videos, right, yeah, okay, because compe US other us. Yeah, you need to create familiarity with your brand. I talk about the office all the time, right, who remembers that show, the office? I mean I still watch it pretty much every day. So it whether it's on Netflix or like on clips. I watch a lot of like office clips on Youtube now to my play the best of Michael Scott Or, you know, the rise of Ryan the tent, like so such good compilation clips and, by the way, a great example of how brands could be doing video. You know, if you're a bigger brand, you could be doing video that's like the best of you know, fruits necks, and you're compilating video that your client, that your customers have sent you over the time. Right, crowdsource and cuse type of content or whatever. The were old kind that you've already made able. Okay, but I digress. All right, you're going back to the structure to create familiarity. So think about the office. You Watch the office. It's Hilarious, it's awesome. You Know Jim and Pam and that that theme song done, Anna, done right. But then you log in the next week, you go to watch the next episode and the theme song is completely changed. Michael's now been replaced by, I don't know, William Shatner, Jim's not even a character, and and and PAM has been swapped out with Angela, and you're like, what is this show? Yeah, yeah, this is what you guys do in your videos. Every videos different, or maybe you make three videos that are the same and then the other two are on this thing. You've got to create show. You have to create show which is a, you know, a similar look and feel throughout each episode so that your viewer logs in and number one thing is that they see production values that remind them of media they're familiar with. That might sound confusing. Here's my point. When you try to do your own thing and video, people watch that and they go what is this crap? X. But when you follow a proven model, even if you hate it, even if you're like me and you hate like doing things the exact weight someone else did them because you're a leader, you know, I hate that, but you start your video kind of the same way that all youtube videos in your niche start to create familiarity so that your ewer goes okay, all right, this person's similar to what I'm used to. And then as you keep going, you you build out formula, you show that you're structured, you show that you're serious and they'll tune in again and again and again, and so having structure. It's I talked about it so much and it might seem so confusing. It's seriously like a one hour conversation when you first get started and then you just do that every time for a year. Well, it's kind of like you think about. I was writing about something of the day about, you know, sitcoms. They all followed the same exact pattern. It's a opening and open hook for two or three minutes, a quick maybe intro to the theme song, back into four, five or six commercial break, the serious thing in the middle for about eight minutes of commercial break. Yeah, they've done the same thing for what twenty thirty years, gone to say, but you'll have some and it's okay. I think here. I think you would agree. Over time your show might change a taed and that's okay, but make it small. Don't make...

...massive changes overnight. Yeah, like you know, I think of you know, shows that I've watched in the past. Also, like you said, new characters, you know, like, oh my Gosh, who is this? You heard the voice over now playing the role of Bow Duke, you know. Yeah, yeah, it's your ever Roseanne. Did that rose and the daughter, the oldest daughter, back poice, you know. Yeah, and yeah, she came back. Yeah, she keeps you and I remember that being like, even as a kid, like this is not the same show anymore. And you know, I don't want to get all like, oh, whether you not you like rose and, but as a kid I was like, you know, like, I guess I I remember just being like, I'm over this show. These are also connors. It's on now. They have yeah, they had. They had both of them on the same time. She played a different character the other one did. It was so fun. You know, I really love the reboots of the shows, although like, I don't want them to reboot scrubs. I want them to just let scrubs did love the podcast they have right now for that of herd as phenomenal. Oh, I gotta see that. I've there's the office, ladies, there's a podcast. It's it's called real friends, fake doctors. And it's there the guys on the show talking about scrubs and I'm here now. I hear the I heart radio as all the time on the radio and I'm driving and so I don't go to Chine, I wouldn't have been scrubs guy. But yeah, stuff like that is really fun. But I love scrubs in you you know, when it first came out had it was, I thought, kind of revolutionary the way they did this one Tang or this one shot, one camera style in comedy and it was just a really great lesson. Baby and Ortis is watching on my watch party and he's saying that we're launching video content this week. We've been working on channel research and finding out what else is happening in the industry before we just start making content that nobody wants to watch. That is such a great point in this. This kind of comes back to programming and production. Is You know, if you don't have the discipline for Youtube, okay, the four disciplines, then you're going to make crap nobody wants to watch and you're going to make it crappily right. So you try to think about that. You have to find content that people actually want to watch and then you have to deliver it in a way that they're kind of used to. That doesn't mean copying someone else's style, although that happens all the time. What it means is is following a structure, the framework. You add your own expertise and flavor on top of that to make the house your own. But at the end of the day, if you know the great formula and you're watching and you start watching TV and other youtube videos, you'll see the formulas in there. Right. They just are pros at it, and so that's does. Everybody uses a structure. It's unsuccessful youtube channels that that don't follow a structure, and this is often the loudest advice that you get on social media, but loudest advice that you get are from people that aren't doing the work, and you got to be careful of that. All right. So we've talked about programming. We've gone on. We're going to go a little more than our normal show. Hopefully that's okay for everybody watching and for you, ow and because we're only we're almost an hour already. Sure. Wow, we've talked about programming your youtube channel. We talked about production and producing your youtube video. You've produced it. It's not like to feel the dreams. If you build it, they were come. What do you do once you've got a video? How do you promote? How do you get views? I talked to Scott Simpson recently. He gave a really cool little tip, like he takes his videos and post them on Reddit and get some outs outside traffic, which is something I want to test. But what are ways that people can promote their videos once they've yeah, I really like that. I think that for every single person, your promotion workflow or your promercion, your promotion checklists gonna be a little bit different. Right I'm working with a local real estate agent right now at a Tucson producing phenomenal videos. Steve Dooley, first respond to real estate, really doing a great job, and we were creating his promotion checklist right now, and that's going to include emailing his list in bulk, but also emailing select clients. This is going to be a handful of people that you're...

...going to reach out in small groups. Maybe like it's five people on facebook, maybe it's seven on Linkedin and maybe it's like four people you're going to send a text to and maybe it's even like ten people that you're going to send a one to one to. This is key for your videos, okay, in the beginning especially, is that you're sending in bulk as so that your video is part of your content, but that you're also thinking of, you know, who are individual people or pockets of friends that I can talk to that would be interested in this content. Right, you said it to them on a more individual life way. And it's still copy and paste. I mean it's still like hey, Jim, I thought you might like I just work kind of a new video. Thought you might like to see us. Then you want to talk about your facebook groups and where you're where you want to send there. Now let me be really careful here, because growing a youtube channel is not about getting your facebook friends to come and watch you for ten seconds on Youtube, leave a comment and x out. That is not youtube strategy. Okay, but what we are doing is we are alerting your network that you're uploading to youtube. Now, some people are going to leave you a comment, a stock. Great job. It's your uncle and he's never going to watch another video again. That's fine. He gave us ten seconds watch time on that video and a comment. Right. The whole idea, though, is what about Fabian? Let's say Fabian sees you, goes, I didn't realize Scott was uploading, and then Fabian's uploading his own stuff and so he decides to subscribe to you and check in on you every week because you're both building on Youtube. And so the idea is is that you're sharing your video systematically over a period of time and bringing new audience over to Youtube and over time you're going to slowly start backing off of the facebook posting and, you know, the group posting and you're really going to focus, you know, primarily on the Youtube Algorithm sharing your content out. Now, Scott Simpson, awesome friend, good guy, love them to death. is read at a great idea, I think. Right. It's a great idea for Scott's content. Right, I don't know that, rhd, it's the best idea for my content, so I steer clear from it. However, if you're going to do a show like how how I'd run Donald Trump's social media, that would be a really good one to put on red heck. Yeah, right, but I think, yeah, I think to you got to have the relationship. I think you can to hop on ready today and start post, you'll get blast and kicked off. You got to agree and actually be an active user on there. You need to share your content with your network as it exists today, and this is the big challenge with Youtube is that so many of us are networks. Are Sort of like intermatter with like our aunts are uncle's, our clients, our bosses are colleagues, like that's your facebook profile and your facebook page doesn't really get a lot of attention. Well, you know, the whole process of you is that Youtube doesn't work that way, but in order to get your videos off the ground, you do need sort of like, you know that movie off where the guys a bunch of balloons. I watch it a lot, okay, have to, I've seen it. You know, like you're borrowing balloons from your friends, you're borrowing balloons from your uncle, you're borrowing balloons from your boss and you're just kind of borrowing these balloons to help give your channel some liftoff until Youtube starts getting you out into the suggested Algorithm. A great way to do this is to not use obvious s SEO titles. Know this. If Youtube looks at your title and goes and goes I'm not exactly sure where to put this. Then then they can't rank it and so it goes out to people in that they think will like it. And if you've done a good job with your content, that's exactly what you want. You Want Youtube, you know, saying, well, there's no seo value here, so let's find other users. Why is that good? Because there are more other users that would be interested in your content tent on Youtube at any given time. Then there are people searching for your content, and so you want to show youtube that you know who your audience is and help them to find your audience. And one two questions about promotion. Addition to that, would run and...

...adds to those videos. Is that worth it? And not. I wouldn't do it. Like I wouldn't do it because, again, what it does here is it is. It says, I don't want to build a youtube channel, I just want views and I want people to see my views. Right. And so what we recommend, especially in the beginning, the first couple of videos, is you don't really share it too much at all, like you just get it on Youtube, start working on the next video, get it on Youtube and start working on the next video because I want to like pull you off of the I need views. I need views. Hey, newslash, I know, I know you want views and I know you won't watch time. I'm going to show you how to get it, and it doesn't come from magical keywords and it doesn't come from paying me a bunch of money. It comes from making the next video for you. Okay, so that being said. That being said, you know it's important to have a little bit of an outbound strategy. Yeah, so that so that you know you're creating conversation and hopefully you're using videos that you'll use again. You know, the idea is that you're creating these videos and it's great for clients, and so every time you meet a new client you're sending them hey, what well, really great to meet you today at the conference. Are really great to meet you today on too, and I hope you get to know them more. Hey, here's a video I did last week. I think you're really enjoy boom and you're sending out your videos to new prospects all the time and you're gaining watch time that way. And so you know, Youtube's a long term game and when you go into it and when I say long term, you know if you're making content, that's like. If you're making content, it's like for the general American market place. Your growth potential, it's like it's like a hundred times harder, but your growth potential a hundred hun figger. Right, you could grow way faster. But if you're a wood worker in Cincinnati growing a youtube channel, you know it. Give yourself a year on Youtube and give yourself ninety days. That first undy day is to just develop a discipline to do it right and have every list of goals to like. You're not going to be you know you're going to have a thousand subscribers. Probably. Ever, if you're that would worker and Cincinnati, you meant. Well, Huh, a hundred might be great for you. You know not. Yes, I think after goodyear. Good I do think I can get you. Woodworking is big enough on Youtube where I think that you could end. You can get it's a hundred thousand subscriber channel from right, but you first have to make video that people want to watch. And if you're so focused. I know creators that will spend two hours on Seo finding the perfect you know, the perfect magic word, and then they make the video and it gets seven views. What if you had spend that same two hours making a better video? Right? It's a big difference, right, and that's where progress comes in, which is the last point, and that's you know, look at your analytics, look at where you where you you know one and where you fell with this video. Now one quick question you. We hop in the progress a little earlier. That's cool. It progressed well, but one thing I'm curious. I don't know if you've done this and promotion. I hear that people talk about be active on other youtube channels and adding comments things. Is there? Is there any value in that? I hear that a lot. I'm like, yeah, man, yeah, there's a lot of life that they've been reading the comments. You know, that's what yeah, it's not. That's not it like. It's not like adding comments section is going to blow up your channel. It's more about making friends on Youtube and having a community on youtube that's interested in who you are and wants to see what your videos are. You know, I have people like this. I follow channels that have a thousand subscribers because I like the person. I'll tell you Diane gladdening is one of these people. She's a newer creator. She does excellent work and I'm intrigued by it. So, Diane, if you're watching, you know full with way to go. You know, the whole idea is that you're not. It's not just look at me on Youtube, it's look at us. Right. I've come up in this game with like Nick Nimmon, Brian Johnson, Tom Martin, you know, Mattgalen, Daryl eaves and and some of these guys have bigger channels to meet, some of them do not, but we've all sort of come up together and we support each other. That's that's the thing, you know,...

...is having that network of people. And Yeah, you know, every now and then you'll do a video, for example Brian Sellers, love the guy, smaller creator, but we're like in spirit and in Heart. You know what I mean? And he you know, he said, Hey, your video the other day was so good, I'm going to share it on twitter. Well, believe it or not, guys, I don't get a lot of people sharing my stuff on twitter, you know, and and I think I know the reason for that, but I'm you know, I'm grateful for that. That never would have happened if I wasn't friends with Brian in the first place, you know. So part of leaving comments and supporting other creators is about creating community so that when you do make that video that they really love, they're willing to share it and they want it to go out. And so I wouldn't say like, Oh, I need to comment on seven people's so that my channel takes off. I would say, you know, I need to have like a solid twenty five, you know, people that I work with here and that I communicate with and we reciprocate and we support each other and then you make efforts into those relationships. Yeah, and I think, Oh, you know, I mentioned earlier, not my nine years watching all these minecraft videos all the time. He's guys, these creators, they got, you know, hundreds of thousands of scribes, subscribes at that millions. But with what I see them doing, I see a lot of people just especially when you got a network like like your imtion pen on where your niches they collaborate with one another and that can be a huge catalyst when for especially those Gamers, when either're both filming the video or Hey, this guy's going to be a mind and he's promoting and he's tagging. So there's there's something to that. have in that network be I think, this adding, you know, being that guy who's on everybody's blog commenting that no one pays attention to. Yeah, I don't see much value. Yeah, you know, that's I think that's a big one. And you know, we've got some great people in in our audience. You know, we've got like Nick Wood, is part of the community, Fabian or te shine cantle for watching right now, and these are all people. I mean I interviewed Sean Cantle, you know, five years ago in the starbucks lobby, starbucks shop at a conference and I remember being like, you know, hey, Sean, you know, it's your pleasure to meet me. You know what I mean? Shot is obviously been, you know, just iconic, if not legendary, in this space, and it's those relationships that you form that are going to help get your channel to to the next level. So, you know, those are a lot of things to think about when it comes to promoting your videos, but at the end of the day, you want youtube to be suggesting your video to other users, and the way to do that is to have a solid tabletop with for solid legs. That way youtube sees up. This is a real estate agent. I'm going to send this video to people watching videos about buying homes right and that's part of this. The next, the last, Seppord, on the progress. Once you once you start getting to that and they know he are and they recognize you are, you should start seeing progress. So how do you? How do you measure your progress? How do you know that is doing well? What do you what do you do here at this point? Well, I'll tell you. I've said this before and I'll say it again. Youtube is the most mature social media platform in the world today, and what I mean by that is their algorithm is unhackable, and it's unhackable because so many millions and billions of minutes of time and verbiage and personality have an uploaded to their artificial intelligence that it it acts almost human, and so the algorithm is almost unhackable, meaning you can't just put a picture of a, you know, a Bustie Babe on your thumbnail and get clicks anymore like that was twenty years ago. Youtube more sophisticated now and they give you, you know, hundreds and hundreds of analytics to look at you can literally see the moment people stop watching your video and you can make changes now. Because they give you so much data can be a tad overwhelming, and so you need to look at numbers that are appropriate for your growth. Right now, all right, in the very beginning, what you need to be looking at is your clickthrough rate, your ctr what that means is your thumbnail image. How many times that that thumbnail...

...image appear on someone's computer screen? And that might be from their new youtube feed, it might be from the brows features, it might be from an email that youtube sent out that said Hey, O and just uploaded a new video. It might be that they saw the thumbnail from a link preview in Facebook, or you both emailed your people or you sent someone a text and the thumbnail appeared on the phone. Your click through rate is anytime your thumbnail appeared and how, what percentage of people clicked through it. So the higher the click through rate you get, the more views you'll get faster on your video. So you want to be looking at a good, quick through rate. The other part of what you're doing is you're looking at your watch time or your average view duration, which is what percentage of the video did People Watch? And that breaks down into two numbers, a percentage, but also a minute time, so it might be like thirty percent or five minutes and twenty two seconds. Right. Follow those two numbers, those two metrics, three numbers and two metrics, and you have everything you need to grow your channel to a thousand subscribers in ninety days. No joke. Okay, you make those numbers as good as they can be. With every new upload. You'll find yourself at a thousand subscribers very, very soon, and you can track all of that in the Youtube studio at I s. download the Youtube Studio. Yeah, you know my clients are like. You know my cinds. I tell them since day one it's kind of like a once you get started, get the youtube APP. But even just going back and then be like hey, show me your because I asked my clients all time like a, show me a screenshot of your youtube at. I want to see where your videos at. As all, I didn't download it. You. Even my clients forget that they need this APP. But get this APP and check in with it every single day because it's up to the minute analytics on your videos. Well, good day. You got to change you got to change. Sorry, Scott, but you gotta change what you're doing. If you're analytics, sock right like, if you're looking, you got thirty percent watch time. That's pretty like low end of average. So I've even seen worst videos of like fifteen percent. I saw a sales coach do a video on health tips during covid and you know what that means. It's just chasing views. You're just trying to go viral, right. Fifteen percent watch them. Yeah, and nobody watched it. That's the thing. I had Eddie Garrison show recently talk about business analyks for facebook's. If you're not look at your analytics, you know for one you're missing out. But your analys will tell you what content your audience wants to see and that's so crucial. You've got to look at that and see if they're dropping off Fishal on youtube, because they're analyxtra so phenomenal. If they're, everybody's dropping off, you know, twenty percent in, then what are you doing at that twenty percent mark? Yeah, causing that changeing. I can see. You can see these big dips and these big drops and so you got to say, okay, what did I do there? And you have to get really critical here, because it could be as simple as introducing yourself and people just didn't want to hear it. Yeah, you know, and you got to say do I so, for example, and all of my videos, not all, but most, I see a little bit of a dip when I do my bumper in my intro. So I have to ask myself, am I willing to cut those things out or am I willing to cut those viewers off? And I'm willing to cut the viewers off. Look, if you're so in need, in need of my crack content, but you can't stick around for me to say my name, I don't really need you on the channel. Okay, so I really don't. You know if you're not going to watch because I didn't do it fast enough. And Look, I'm going to say who I am and I'm going to tell you my company name. That's that's the price you paid for getting this free content. Like they can pump forward fifteen seconds. That's right, we're and that's probably what that is anyway, is just them skipping forward. So which would appear as a little dip in your analytics. And so there are. You have to make decisions. You can say, am I going to keep doing that? I'm going to stop doing that now. I'm going to keep doing my intro because it's four seconds right, and I it's okay if I lose that little bit of a dip. But what about when I'm doing sort of a rant and I'm losing tons of viewers? Well, in my mind that's like I need to show some B roll, I need to cut away to something and and I'm willing to change that. So we have sort of a kind of a rule where if it's on my face for too long, cut to something else, like with the ten...

...seconds. Cut to something else, because the viewers will skip through the video while they're watching it. So and they're going to move forward to where you show something. So keep showing stuff and you'll keep viewers watching. You can build that into your structure so that you're doing it this way every single time, and it's not hard. I mean, if I came on here and I was telling you how to make meat loaf, you know, from scratch, it would sound confusing, right, it would sound. But when you go get a recipe, when you buy the book on how to do it's like Oh, these seven thanks. So I understand. Like these four things might all my gosh, it's so much, but like join the program come in and see how it works. Let's do this, do this, do this, do this and press record and you'll find that you have an assembly line like system for creating awesome videos all the time that grow your channel and generate eatwe company. That was a lot and we probably could have gone like another hour there. We talked about program we talked about preting a production, promoting and progress. All right, I would appreciate you been a where's there's a good place for everybody to come and go and find you and see what you're doing. Other other than we know your instagram account you mentioned. I am everywhere on the web at Owen Video. We have a new video on youtube every single week on my channel, so subscribe to me over there. But if you want to engage and just be a part of like our everyday life, instagram instagram stories where we're engaging on the daytoday basis, and I'd love to follow you guys there, and also make sure you go over to video marketing schoolcom and you can see everything Owen's doing and sign up for some of his programs. Probably even find an Ros or get some help with videos. Lots of great stuff on the website. Yeah, lots of good tools. They're all right and I appreciate you being on the show. Of Me that there's a lot of fun and we'll have to do it against it. Thank you, God, always a pleasure of my man flo. All right, hey, thanks for listening to the social media lab live podcast. If you want to check out the rest of the story, if you will, go to social media lab dot live.

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