Social Media Lab LIVE!
Social Media Lab LIVE!

Episode · 1 year ago

The Science of Managing a Franchise's Social Media w/ Eddie Garrison

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Eddie Garrison (marketing genius and fellow data geek) joins the Social Media Lab LIVE this week to talk about social media marketing for franchises!

In this episode you'll learn:

  • How to land franchise clients
  • Setting expectations for franchise clients
  • Creating content for franchise clients
  • The good, the bad and ugly of franchise marketing
  • The data that matters to franchise clients

Welcome to the social media lab live podcast. is a Scott Airs, the content scientist here at the Social Media Lab, where we bust the myths, the rumors and the stories of social media marketing with science. In this episode of the Social Media Lab live I'm interviewing my good friend Eddie Garrison from clover media and had the honor to talk to him early in January of two thousand and twenty one about how he got a big, huge franchise deal running, I think, almost thirty different locations and profiles for a franchise. We're going to talk about how he landed that deal. How do you manage the franchises social media? How you handle, you know, expectations, how do you handle billying? How do you handle just all that's wrapped up in a franchise, because there's a lot more involved with running social media for a franchise and there is just a local pizza restaurant. Listen to this episode, take some notes and go find a franchise to run their social media for. Remember, you can run over to social media lab dot live to listen and watch and read all of the live interviews that we have done here at the social media lab over the last year. Now onto my interview about France chises with Eddie Garrison. Eddie Garrison, if you don't know who Eddie is, Eddie is the owner of clover media consulting and brings over like a decade of sales marketing experience from a corporate level. He's will versed in in complete you know, project management, testing, implementing. Need to get a data geek and nerd just like me. Last time he was on one of my shows he actually had orange hair on, I did, which was a lot of fun. So, Eddie, thanks for hopping on the very first episode of Social Media Ab Alive with me this year. It's an honor. Man, thanks for reaching out. Yeah, I've been looking forward to this show quite a bit, to be honest with you, and here's why. I think. Just for one, it's a topic I don't hear what people talk about to I work for, like I mentioned in when we opened, I work for CCI's pizza for number of years as a general manager. That's pizza value edny, where there were used to me two hundred and ninety onine, but all you can buffet man it was three dollars and twenty four. Since our three and twenty five cents, I think it was every time, and we knew it was three, three four back in the S. and then I work for one another large franchise you own. They own like it was Windmar, so they own like seventy five locations or around the south and so I was one of the General Menagers of the store in Houston. So yeah, so I understand the franchise model and a lot of people don't. But franchises are such a great set up for people to get started. They don't have to come up with branding right, they don't have to figure around, you know, how to do a and be and all this to the kind of give it to you. They've just left your location. They help make your store, or whatever it is, look the same that way. If you walk in the any McDonald's, and McDonald's really started this, you walk in any McDonald's around the world almost they pretty much look the same, you know, the same experience. The Burger should taste about the same. Yeah, and that's the whole idea of franchises and that's why I think they're such an interesting model for for people to do. So yeah, and so tell us a little bit before we kind of hop into what we want to kind of dive into. What what has happened to you recently and and you know, regarding franchises. You I know you can't tell us the name. I'm not going to ask you the name, yeah, of the particular franchise, unless you just want to go to give us an idea. But how did that come to fruition and kind of how many locations are you? Are you managing all that kind of good stuff? Right. So how it came to fruition was I actually had a friend very similar to you, having friends on all the time and marketing friends, and I had her on my show and after the show she's like, Hey, I've got an opportunity upcoming that I might need your help on. And funny enough, it actually started out not being social media management. For those that don't know, I actually come from a graphic design background. That's I went to college and graduated college with graphic design degrees, and she was reaching out to me for graphic design help for this particular franchise that she potentially was going to have come on. So it kind of kick the tires like that. It kind of let the fires a little bit and a couple of days goes by, she reaches back out. She goes, Hey, I've got another opportunity with this same people. What would it take for you to come on board and do their social media management as well? So obviously I went down, you know, my checklist and go, okay, what's going to be involved? How many pieces of content are we going to have to create? How many posts are we going to be have to doing, you know, a week, a month, a year? You know, the basic checklist that I go down. And then she came back to this was like, Hey, I just need a price and you know, we you know, without this closing any of that information. You know, we went back and forth on that. I mean not like negotiating, you know, with just email exchanges and things of that nature. And she...

...goes yeah, well, you know, they're still moling it over because they were still actually with another agency and they had to, you know, be released from that contract at the end. And once they did that, we get the green light to go, and it's been a hundred and thirty miles an hour, head first into the deepend ever since now. Are you doing this on your own or you it's a pretty much your one man getting a band or do you have other employees or how's that work for you? I'm a one man show Mana a lot of people are, and if you can go it off, it's great. I don't know, with the amount of locations you're doing that thing, I would have a hard time. And Yeah, Oh yeah, forgot to have that question. This particular franchise and I'm working we now has twenty three locations across North America. That's a lot that's allowed just to deal. So basically, if you think about that, that's twenty three individual clients. Correct. If you were to go out there and try to find those businesses, you've got twenty three of them just boom right there in one one bang. Yeah, and when you look at them, twenty three sounds like a lot, but you have to double that because they have facebook and instagram. So just for this, just for this one customer, I'm managing forty six social media profiles. Pretty impressive and I'm I'm really happy for you. Got Me. When you told me not, I was like yeah, yeah, or any do this and kind of pickure. I was like, I'm ready to pick your brain about this. Yeah, I know we've been going full tilt since October with them. So I've got a lot of I guess, data is that's what it is, basically. Yeah, you d tell me and we know to like well, I said when we started, we were not going to ask you any of the name or anything like that because he can't write close your purposes and stuff and some of the data he can't give up. But you're going to kind of help us walk through some things about, you know, the science, if you will, running social media for for a franchise. And the first thing I kind of wanted just to kick this off is how do you land those clients? I know you were in a little different situation where someone needed some work done and so that was a fur one way perhaps, but right tell is maybe some ways that you've done in the past or you would recommend if you want to find these franchise, big franchise clients like this. Right, yeah, just so what you alluded to actually this is done under somebody else's name, so I'm basically a white label or a contract provider for them, if you will. So one of the first things is just to reach out to people that you already know that might be a little bit bigger than you don't be. You know, don't be intimidated. You know I mean if you've spoken with them before, the dialog is already there. They obviously know who you are and know your work, because one they've even reached out to you before to enquire maybe about, you know, bringing you on to help with a certain service here or certain service there. So go ahead and open up those, you know, those channels of dialog with people that you already know that maybe are working with customers that are a little bit bigger than you think you personally or your agency can go after. Number two is, honestly, ask them right. I don't care if it's like a chick fil a franchise in your hometown, a walk on's, even a mcdonaleld not, probably not McDonald's, but if there's like a regionalized franchise in your area, do not be afraid to call on them, walk into their corporate offices, because they're usually going to have one in that area, and go you know what, Hi, you don't. My name is Scott Airs. I have this agency, you know. I'm looking to see if you guys need any help with digital marketing, social media management, video production photography, because you never know what they have or what they're actually in need of or, even better yet, what they don't like about the people that they're already doing business with. Now, I'm not going to sit here and say you should submarine other agencies, because I'm not saying that at all. But you know, a lot of people sometimes are just looking for a change or they don't publicly state that they have an issue or they have a problem or a pain point that they need help one and they're waiting for people to proactively come to them so they can look at you and see what you've done, look at your track record and make a decision there. Because when you start talking about franchises, there's a level of like a chain of command that has to go. So it's not like you're walking into a mom and pop shop where the guys going to own the pizza shop and he can make the decision right there. It's got to go up a ladder, a chain away, and so there's a there's a big difference between marketing yourself to the local community and marketing yourself to potentially a national or a global community. Yeah, and I think a good way to like when I think of when I go to say and you see, you see mainly friend at least I do. Franchise that are restaurants, so many restaurants that you go, especially if they've got any sort of national branding, you know they're usually some sort of franchise. Look at the door when you walk in, are you drive up, it'll say who the franchise is. Typically, Yep. Go look those people up and go hey, I'm here in, you know, Orlando, and I see you are as well. You've got you can look them up. See Im me locations they got. You got X, Y Z these locations. I love to help you. I'm talked about your marketing. Blih, blah, blah. I've I've done it literally where I was sitting in the restaurant eating all the person's name on the door and started looking them up on social media right then. Yeah, and that's the way to do it, I mean, because you go from you know, just one clients, nice enough, but if you get if that franchising, and most franchise's except for outside of this. A little fun...

...fact that I that I've learned over the years about Chick Fila. I think you mentioned Chick Fil A. Man, I go yeah, Chick Fil A. Typically they don't actually call them franchises. Now they're partners, partners, and it's a like a million dollar investments a bit are you got to at least have a whole lot of cash in your bank. But they typically let most of those guys have one location, and that's some of them will have to if they're in a smaller market, like where I'm at. It's a smaller market. So there they have to and but most of them only have one, which is it really interesting unique things. And not to get way off topic, but you brought up chick fil a like, and I think this is still true you and I right now. It could not go buy one because we don't work there. You actually had to work, that's at a location. Before you can actually apply for a franchise. They you had to be there for a couple of years and know the business and you've got as the partner. You actually have to run it. You can't higher general managers like our franchise. He's did right. You've actually got to be in there in the chicken aren't yelbow deep and figuring out the whole thing. So yeah, maybe, so that's that's a couple of ways of how to land a franchise. It's very similar to any other brand you might go after, but it's just that potential is so much greater because immediately, I think for you, like what I'm excited about for you, Eddie, is let's fast forward six months to a year. You get this on your resume now that you've run social media for twenty three locations. Right. Wise, he company man that that really is leverage to other franchises. Yeah, out there and say, you know, I can handle this, I can handle yours. You know right. And that's actually a good segue into kind of going back to how you do this. You need to have some kind of media kit or a pitch kit, if you will, get together right. That's outlining who you don't. Don't get into the weeds. Make it pretty high level and say, you know, this is who I am, this is my company, this is what we offer, this is who we've done it for, this is the results that we came up with. And for any any time that you can have a case study or any kind of data to back it up. And it doesn't have to be on their level. Right, if you're going after a franchise, it doesn't necessarily have to be on a global level. Give them real honest numbers of what you've helped people do improve to them that you solve the pain point at a local level, that this stuff is scalable and you know what you're talking about. But these guys, they're on the fly, these executives, they don't have forty five minutes to go through, you know, a fifteen page add for yourself. Make it very succinct. If you can say it in seven words, do not say it in ten. Make it very easily understandable and give them a clear call to action at the end to get back to you, just because of how powerful the data and everything that you went over is very, very true, and I see some comments coming in over here. Justin says ask at if you don't ask, you know, you never know. We're saying they can say is no, and dad's got a great question. Now we're going to get to your question actually here and a bit about managing content and all that sort of stuff. And Justin did say something. I guess he's comment about chick fil a, that he wants another one in his town, and so I know in our in our area are with the guy who has to chicklay locations actually has a food truck and so it's what they do. It's actually in my I live in a small town and we're not big enough for a chick fil a, and so he brings he goes around a different area every day during the week and there's a small town, you know, a small town, Ten fifteen tho people, mainly are our less, that the park of a big town a chick fil A. Yeah, thanks, I think you got have us. They they require certain amount of pay. Do Yeah, but there's their food truck. Is kind of my kids down on Windsday. Wednesday's is usually chick fil a day at our house because they know the food trucks in town will go over there. So every just hopping on. I'm talking to Eddie Garrison. We're talking all about the science of managing and running social media for franchises and franchise he's and so we just talked about how to land franchise clients. Now we've we've landed them. We won't talk about what the charge and stuff because I think that's so dependent on that particular market and what you're you're doing and delivering. That's a whole other show and conversation that perhaps we could have, and maybe you can ask Eddie and reach out to Eddie. He can kind of consult you on that perhaps about what we've already layd in them. We sign the contract, how do we set expectations for these clients, because there's a lot of looked love that have a lot of locations, they have a lot of stuff coming in. How do you set those expectations for them? So one of the first things that happens when you get a larger customer like this, especially franchises, is they are going to have basically a company wide meeting where it's going to be the CEO, the vice presidents, the the the internal marketing team, if they have one, the internal art department, if they have one, and typically a representative from every franchise location that's out there. Now what we typically call this is a kickoff meeting to kind of introduce ourselves to you know who we are, what we're going to be doing and kind of an overview of how the flow is going to go on, because a lot of these guys that own these franchises, they don't do anything with the social media, they don't know anything...

...about it. They know they've got a facebook page and an instagram page and somebody just does it right. So let's just say that you had a franchise of ten, you know, just to make the math simple, eight of them have no idea what goes on on facebook and instagram. Two of them want to know every single thing, will look at every post and they will read every single word that you post on there. So the first thing that's going to happen is you're going to have a kickoff meeting. Once that's there, you, you know, like I said, you kind of say what you're going to do, who you are, how you're going to be doing it, and that flows into another meeting, and that's going to be with the key internal players. So usually that's going to be somebody like me, the social media manager, the Internal Marketing Team, the internal art team and usually somebody pretty high up on the corporate side of the franchises, because that's the ones that are going to be making the overall decisions on how the content should look, what it needs to say, the context that needs to be, you know, any any kind of branding guidelines. It goes on. That's going to be worth that meeting. Comes into play. Once you have all that figured out, then you actually go into okay, let's do an internal audit to see what has been working and, more importantly, what has not been working for the franchises, because you have to take a lot into consideration when you're talking about multiple franchises in multiple geographic areas, not only just the United States or maybe a Canada, or even perhaps Europe or the world, but just different time zones, different local places, right, because what works in Florida may not work for an environment. And say Washington State, we don't get snow in Florida, they get a lot of snow northwest. Right. To take all this into consideration. So these are going to kind of be some of the work flows early on that you try to pin down to say, okay, well, when we post this in Florida, we have to come up with something different in Washington. Yeah, that would think even to like let's think Swish, because we're in the US and we can. You know, it is what it is. I mean different political climates in each of those airs. You probably be careful what you say they're and what's going on. Like Georgia was created with election stuff yesterday, right probably if I, if I was, you know, running social media something in Georgia, I probably would have held lay it off yesterday, just let all that stuff get out of the feeds and they kind of go back. So you kind of have to know that. And then another thing that you have to come into play too is if you're talking about international customers, they may spell something differently than you do. So when you're crafting your content, you have to meet you know, cognizant of okay, this is being posted in Canada, so it has to be spelled see and tree, not see and tier or like the favor with the Oh, you are though, you are. Yeah. And then you know you have to look at time zones. So if you're looking to post something, it's a thirty am, well, that's that needs to be thirty am local time. So if you're scheduling your content out and I'm on the East Coast, thirty am, but in California that's thirty am, so you need to adjust her so when you post it for California, you're posting it at thirty, not ten thirty, because that's ten thirty their time, not to thirty year time. Very true. So anything else like I'm playing around with restreams. thumbnails so you have to forgive me why I'm in the life like Hey, I'm when the play around. In a minute. I was like I'm going to actually do this and you're going to be in the wrong spot. I did see them a peripheral man. I just wanted it. It's fun to kind of this play around there means that. So if you'll see me do that, I'm playing out with the restreams live studio. Yep, I do. I do think when you get a client like that, any client, but especially one of you're doing twenty three locations, like I'm going back to. I'll keep going back to the CC's pizza. I mean they own like seventy something. They forty five just in the Houston market. I think so. I mean that's a lot to take on and expectations are going to have to be set in the beginning of your workload of when you're going to get field over, how you're going to get paid exactly, and and that's all laid out before you actually start diving into the content, right, so that that's all hammering out before you have to worry about the workflow where you're getting your digital assets. From are you creating the imagery? Are they sending it to you? How are you getting that? Who is responsible for getting that to you? So there's a lot of infrastructure that's actually set up that is typically not there when you're dealing with, say, like a one off local restaurants and you know something right and you hope, I mean you hope if these, you know a few these franchise these are they own more than one. They're a little more organized. Would hope. You'd hope, not always, but you would hope. And sometimes franchise. He's just on one location. That's it. So that's right. You would handle them probably like you would for the most part a typical restaurant. Would say I can make the restaurants because they're the most popular. But I mean you'd handled like in the regular restaurant to except they're going to have some very brand you know specific, you know things they can and can't do. You can't do this with the logo, you can't correct you can't say that if you got to show these a food in a certain way, and so you'll have to kind of know all that beforehand and that's it. That's gone over because typically more often than not, obviously with major franchises, they have a brand guideline basically that they're just going to send to you...

...and you just have to know it. Well, as we're kind of we kind of led into to the we talked about certain expectations and we kind of talked about content a little bit. It's a different animal. Like you just said, they're going to have some brand guidelines, but but how do you go in this will kind of answer like deb. I'd love to answer deb's question in here. At the same time. Can you explain how you manage the content workflow, post where all that kind of good stuff? What is content and running content and managing content look like when you're looking at more than one location for a franchise? Right, so how we have found success in doing this is okay. So we're at what's today, January five, six sixth. I've already got ninety percent of Februaries content calendar done. Right, we try to have the next months, the leading months, content calendar done by the middle of the previous month. So februaries content calendar for the particular franchise will be done by January fifteen. And the reason that we do that is because you're dealing with a franchise. Now right there, like I said in the beginning, there's multiple levels of approval that have to be met. You know, I have to come up with the content coundar now that they provide I would say, Ninety five percent of the digital asset, so I don't have to worry about the photography, the video or anything like that. And more comes down to the copywriting of it. Like you know, and and I'm not saying I have to copyright anything, but what I'm trying to say is people in the marketing world when you write it, so when you see a facebook post the text there, that's just called copyright, right. So I have to come up with the copy get that. I put it all into a content counter that we're all able to view. So it goes basically through almost a four level approval process before it even gets scheduled into my scheduling software. So basically we do a post every other day. So we're looking at between fifteen and twenty pieces of content for every single location per month. So it's going to say like Monday, the first fifty am facebook. You know, here's this, this is the content that we're doing. Here's a hyper link to the image or the video. Then underneath that there's going to be one that's says, you know, Monday the first instagram. There's the copy. Obviously links don't work in there. There's, you know, there's another screenshot of the image that we're going to use, and then here's the hashtags that we're going to use, and then it just goes through the approval process once everybody has looked at it, giving it the twice and fifth over, I didn't go in and start to schedule everything in the scheduling software that I use. So I try to typically do it a week at a time because once you get into like I said, I'm doing forty six pieces of content per day. So if I did it for the entire month I would literally sit here for hours because I'm scheduling thousands of pieces of content. So I just do it in week blocks. That's interesting. So I mean, have you found so far, like you said, that you have to get it, you know one, two or three touches on it? Is that going to be pretty normal for a franchise where you've got to get it like the local franchise? He's got to get it approved by corporate. Yep, let's say. Is that pretty normal? You think, well, what you're going to what you're typically going to do, is you're going to deal directly with corporate. The franchise is going to be OK, they're just going to because, to put it into terms, I guess corporate is the Gospel, right. So whatever corporate says basically has to go. So there's some one off instances, if they're doing like a grand opening or something, or they have somebody famous coming, yes, that's going to be kind of one off content for that location. But Ninety five help, ninety eight percent of the time it's going to be corporate approved. Corporate approved, and then it goes down to the franchises at that point. So I mean how does it look though? So like you're having so your contract is, let's say, let's say, for example, your contract is with this one franchise with you. You've got to talk to marketing out there. That's going to do that take the is the process longer to get content approved? I mean you're talking at your schedule, all of your February. When did you get do the ask and show, Hey, here's the content I want to post in February. Yeah, well, that one is that the deadline for that's the fifteen. Okay, so in December, on December fifteen, we got the entire January's contenting calendar approved. So that's kind of how works. We try to we try to and we're trying to lead up to even more than that. We're trying to do it a full month in advance. But right now the middle of the month, the trailing month is for the next month. Yeah, so that's that's something to think about. And going back to the other earlier point of setting expectations, I mean you're having a start working way ahead. So really keep that in mind when you're billing these franchise that your work starts before stuff goes live. Yeah, and so don't just say, Hey, we'll start, we'll start posting tomorrow and that's when we start getting paid. No, no, no, you're in. You have to work. Also, what you go also, what that allows you to do is because the particular franchise I'm working they have a full art department. Right. So I'm saying, okay, well, this particular type of video has been performing really, really well. We need to shoot more of that, but we need fresh so you have to give them some lead time as well, because they have to, you know, they add up, get all their camera, get a ready. They got to get the camera Guy Ready, they...

...got to get the talent ready, they got to write a script. I got to do it, you know, a run off show. They got to do a screenshot, so, you know, a shot list. So there's lead time that needs to be taken into consideration because you're working with a marketing or even a full on art department as well. Yeah, I think. I think here this kind leads into deb's asking here too. So like location x post the same as locations Z? Yes, yes, for you. I want if it's the same for all franchises. Maybe they're a little bit different. Maybe it's like was employee spotlight? Employe spotlights are one thing. Yeah, but when she's talking about that too, it becomes location specific only in the copy sense. So if you're talking about so let's say you're talking about something that's it, that's in a warm climate, but then you also have a customer that's in a cold climate. So the copy in the imagery is gonna be tweaked to reflect what's going on in that local community, even though it's the same. Like say you're pitching something that says, okay, well, we sell four wheelers, right. Well, four wheelers and winter don't really work, so you can change that for snowmobiles, right. So you just take in the localization of it, but it's still done on a broad spectrum level. Do you do you typically were now? Now, I obviously time zones come into play, but yes, do you typically post at the same time for every location? So it's five o'clock here, it's five o'clock there. Yeah, same for all. Are you you know, the same for all blood like across the board? Just because I go back and look at the analytics and go okay, well, when we posted this at ten in the morning, but then when we post it at one in the afternoon, it really didn't do well. So when we see this location, okay, it's going to be posted, it's Ay like fifteen am, but another location with the same content didn't perform until one. So I'm going to post it one locally. And when I use these times, I'm talking about the local times to these franchises, locations, not one where you're at. Yeah, you got to. Yeah, you would want to post something after hours. Or morning for a local business exactly. Typically do as well because they're not open in my but you have to look at that and looks analytics and kind of see always audience on, you know, and I mean open, on the franchise. Like if you're a if you're doing social media for a franchise that maybe is geared towards mom so it's say like Jim Boree, know those kind of places. You need to know when those moms are on facebook and instagram and post where they're ass so kind of keep that in mind. At every franchise is going to be different exactly, for sure. So yeah, I would imagine the content process is, you know, the most daunting part of this is it is it honestly, once like you get everything approved and the content calendar is good to go, you could turn your focus now into you know, start to scheduling, to content, and then that's when the community management comes into play. Now you do the community manager for them, or I new you do. Okay, so I know some of your clients you don't. So yeah, that's guys. So how does that look? I mean is that because you've now do you? Did you get any training on how the voice. Yes, rank this. So you did. Okay, how did that look like? How did that work out? So basically, they they have. It's almost covered in the branding guidelines. It's just literally called community guidelines, right for this particular franchise, and they give you the voice of their brand. We don't want to use words like this or I'm not going to specify the words, but like they you know, you're reading these things and it says, okay, we don't want to use words like and then there's a bracket and then there's words listed that we are trying to avoid. Try not to use contractions, try not to use improper grant like because there are very corporate minded franchise, the one in particular I'm talking about. So they have a particular voice that they want to have done. So basically, nine times out of ten what I do is when someone is replying on Facebook, and I'm just going to use facebook as an example, they're looking for like a quote or a cost of something and typically we don't respond to that because obviously I don't know the work that's in type, you know, entailed in doing that and they don't want the social media manager to do that. So what I do is I direct message them and say hey, Scott, thank you so much for your interest in, you know, insert product here. If you don't mind, I'd love to have one of our design consultants call you back. Would you please provide me with your contact and or email address to have them speak to your specific projects needs. I then go back and make sure to reply on the feed and facebook to go high Scott. Please see your direct messages for more details. Thank you. And it pulls it offline because you don't want to have these quotes and estimates underneath, like, say, a sponsored add because people are going to be like, Oh my God, I can't believe they're charging that much, or Oh my God, somebody else got it for cheaper. So I tried it. We try to pull those things offline but still community Cape with them in a very fast manner. Yeah, I think that's that's going that's got to be the most especially we got a franchise, let's say, let's lose the McDonald's. I know they've got their own marketing department that does everything they may. They may subcontract it out, who knows? But yeah, I can. I mean the amount of comments and stuff. Sometimes you're PARC to deal with. It could be a full time job just managing the community side. So yeah, definitely know the voice of that franchise. If you're a windy's, you know we need to get a you know and get I know they do all their own social but you know, they got to come a fun sort of way they talk, so you kind of have to...

...know that. I think that's good. Now again you've gone back twice now talking about content, the expectations you set when you started and you agreed on a contract. That's going to be imperative that you know everything. You don't want to walk in too much laters and, oh, by the way, you can't do that, you're fired. And one of the things that you need to be able to convey as a social media manager is you're not a salesperson. Were not there to generate sales for them, right. You were there to give them a social media presence and direct them to sales departments or websites or landing pages or whatnot. So you need to be able to make sure you set that expectation on day one, minute one of the first meeting you have, because a lot of people want to lump in social media with sales and we are not salesman. Yeah, that's that. Applause, I think, to everybody, you know, even not even not even franchise. So even, like you know, for me personally, I don't I don't sell. I do talk about our product and and I can help as much as I can, but I'm the expert on what those clients need and now I'll divert him to the right people. So I don't mess it up and stick my foot in my mouth now. I I mean we push leads to who needs to be pushed to. So, like if the lead comes in to a franchise and say California, you know, I take a screen grab of all the information that I was supplied to then email them and, you know, just big bulld text and it says social media lead and I say high team, here is a lead that came in via facebook. You know, see attached, boom and it's gone. It's out of my hands. Very cool. A right. So what this? We're going to get into the next thing. We want to talk to genius. Know like that. I did that the last time. You're on the show. So I had to put that on there and just to just to see if you're painting. And you know what, the hardest thing is spelling the word genius. So I always get wrong. I don't know why. I always have to Google it to make sure I get it right, because I don't look like an idiot when I'm spelling the word genius. So so let's talk. Let's get in this and dead as a question to that relate to this is the good, the bad and the ugly. I mean what's you know? I mean obviously you know I go to talk about this specific franchise perhaps, but maybe like what is some of the great things that have happened and you see happening and what are some of the stuff and you're like, holy crap, I didn't know this was going to come into play, or it's a lot more work than I expected, that sort. So what are your thoughts here on this? I just love that. So leave that up. The good, the bad and the ugly. So the good is, once you really get into a flow of things, the process and in the fund that it actually is, because you're not really relying so much showing you creating the content, as much as you are doing exactly what you're supposed to be doing, and that's being basically the voice of the franchise. Right. So social media marketing isn't just about contenting and leaving it up there. It's not about posting and ghosting, right you, you're crafting this content to be engaging, emotional, educational and entertaining, right. That's what you want people to feel. That when people feel that, that's when they engage and that's when they comment and that's when they ask questions. So that's really what they're paying you to do, is to nurture these people into believing, not really believing, but nurturing these people into the thought process of yes, this is something I want or this is something that I need. So once you really get into a good flow and how the content is going to come to you, and then you start to really embrace the voice of it, you actually you get to have a lot of fun with it, because I've got to meet quite quite a few interesting people, you know, commenting and engaging with them off platform, obviously, because that's what you want to try to do, is get it off quickly and get it to whomever needs to be so that's the good portion of it. The bad good. Think I'm not naming the franchise that is, and I would never bad mouth that because they are not a bad franchise whatsoever. I quite enjoy working with them. The bad is a lot of franchise and it is not just to this franchise. You're going to find this with any franchise. Level is it's going to be it's micro managed right. So and if you're just working with the one pizza shop, they're pretty much going to give you full run of what you think and what you know, and you know you're supposed to be the experts, so they're just going to let you run with it. When you work with somebody that's a corporate level, and then the franchises, there is a lot of different levels that go into it. So it's not like you come up with a content counter, give it to him and that they're just going to be oh great that that's not how it works. So you know you're going to have one person that looks at it and they're going to have their edits and thoughts, they're going to have another person that looks at it, they're going to have their edits and thoughts and then it's going to go to the head Han show sometimes, and then they're going to have their interjections. So the bad part is it's the process of getting the content approved takes a lot longer than you probably would even think or know. Yeah, that's probably that. I would think that's the toughest part is. Yeah, the ugly is when something just goes terribly wrong, like you misspell some words or use the wrong image for the wrong product. But you're talking about one product and it's another and you've already scheduled and it's gone out to all forty, six or a hundred accounts or how many you're managing. No one caught it. You get an email at thirty...

...and even thirty at night going that's the wrong image, we have to change it now, but hopefully you had them sign off on that, so that goes back to them. So still have to change it. Yeah, change it, but yeah, I still have to change it. And then you never know, and I can kind of see one of Dev's questions over there as when some thing really terrible happens that's out of your control. Yeah, I think it's the interesting question here. I mean, how do you handle crisis management for franchises, like the lockdowns? Like some areas there's lockdowns or there's a national disaster, Tornado hits or there's a mass shooting, you have to make in a lot of times this isn't your decision. This comes down from a corporate level. You can, you know, insert your own expertise on, you know, knowledge base of what you've done in the past for other customers, but usually that's going to come from a corporate level and they're going to be either going to make one or two decisions. This isn't a there's no gray area in this that I've ever seen when it comes to crisis management with something out of your control. They were either a one going to pro they're going to present a united front across all of their locations, not just say that it happened in Texas so the location in New Jersey doesn't care about it, because that's incorrect. That's not the way it needs to be done, or nothing is going to be said about it. There is no gray area. It's either going to be one or the other. And if you run into that yet with this franchise, no, I haven't. No, hopefully, thankfully, hopefully, hopefully, definitely want, which is and it actually it almost came to fruition because the franchise that I'm working for is actually expanding and one of the locations they're expanding to, I mean I can say this, is it national Tennessee, and then that you know that our V bomb went off in National Tennessee. So we would have had to have dealt with that if they were open, because they were actually quite, I want say quite close, but they were in a five mile radius of where that occurred. Yeah, Nashville really in that big when we think about as far as they don't they have the center of it's all right there down Broadway. Yeah, definitely, so very cololf. No Gray area there. Honestly, it's either going to be one or the other. There's there's typically nothing else going on there. So let's we this was expectations, kind of, but I we want the end this. Talking about data? Of course. Yes, what kind of data do you have? You seen what data do franchise he's want to see from you? The social media managers running all their social one of the biggest things that to them. That would be the other. Yeah, well, I have. I have actually quite a lot to talk about here on this one. The biggest thing is when, when you're giving them the data at the end of the month, at the end of the quarter, at the end of the half of the year, whatever you're you know you're reporting them for. You want to always be able to show some type of growth in the expectations that you've already set. Right. So if their expectation was to push more people to their website or push more people to this product landing page, you need to be able to show a direct correlation and you have to work with their webmaster for that, but you can show a direct correlation to yes, this many more website hits came directly from our facebook content in December. Then it did a November than it did in October, than it did in September. So you want to show this at least steady growth. Now they know there's going to be some peaks and valleys at the time, because no one can just have, you know, exponential growth at the entire time. That's just not a good expectation to set and that's just not realistic. So you want to be able to show that particular growth you know, and hopefully there's no big values, but you want to show that. But you know that that particular growth that they're looking for you also want to show that you're good. Let me learn how to speak contry, that their social media presence is actually growing at the expectations that you said that it could. So if you said, you know what, we've worked with franchises in the past and we have no problem saying that. You know, every month we've had we've seen a five to ten percent increase in your engagement rate. We've seen five to ten percent increase in your you know your reach, your overall reach, your audience, the audience that you're going after, because anybody can go out and buy followers. That's just a black all. You shouldn't do that. you want to grow this organically. Also, you want to show them what type of content is performing good, and I want to talk a little bit about that here in a minute when we get into some actual numbers. But all this is set in the beginning. You have to set these expectations and don't you know what you need to all in everyone's heard of before. You need to under promise and overdeliver. Right. So, if you know that in the past the Franchisees you work with have seen a ten percent growth rate, say that. You're going to say, Oh, you know what will we typically see five, maybe six, seven percent growth rate, and then when you start to show them the ten and twelve in the fifteen, they're like wow, you know, there were already outperforming who they worked with last time. Another good thing that you need to set in the beginning is the benchmark numbers you're going to use. If you don't have a benchmark number, it's going to be near and possible to show any kind of sustainable growth or set an expectation. Now, is that say, when you take over the franchise as social media management, is the first...

...month, the first quarter, whatever you put in there, is that going to be the benchmark? That's probably a good way to do it, because you don't want to benchmark yourself and get somebody else, because somebody else doesn't matter anymore. They're not around anymore. You are. You're the company, you're now the face of this franchise because you're their social media manager. So maybe take the first month of growth and just numbers and go okay, this is my benchmark. So when you look at it in January, that's going to be your benchmark. Come February, did you grow? Come March? You still compare it to January. Don't compare to February because that's not your baseline. Your benchmark is January because that's when you took over, that's when you started to post your content and implement your strategy. Then you look at your analytics and tweak your content calendar away from that benchmark. Right. So your benchmark is always going to be what you said it at and then six months down the line you're still comparing it to that first month's benchmark to go look at this. We've grown twenty seven percent since January. So the expectations need to be set. Then you need to know what your benchmarks are going to be to compare everything else, especially data driven, as you work with the company moving forward. Now, when, when do you when do you move the goal posts? Like when, okay, you got that bench mark, what point to go? Okay, we know now, we we're crushing that. So we've got to move forward. Now, we got to go grow from there, because you know, you don't always may be compared to a year ago. Yeah, is it? Do you typically want to move that a little bit? I'll I like quarterly, because that's just how most businesses work anyway. You know when you're setting up your own annual you know goals and objectives and you know actions and accountability. This is what I do. I mean I do it quarterly, right. So if I have a year goal to say we need to take our engagement rate from ten percent to twenty percent by the end of the year. So if I look at it in January and where at ten percent, and then I come April, first comes round. Okay, we've moved up to fourteen percent. Fifteen percent, great, we're working towards that. So I try to set the overall goal of this is what we're going to shoot for at the end of the year. So I bring the goal post back. Really I don't actually move it forward. I set the goal post at a hundred yard mark and then at the end of the first quart I'm like, okay, wow, we kicked it to the twenty. Cool. Then I look in quo, okay, we're that we were at the fifth yard line, which is perfect, you know. So the goal post actually comes back and then you try to get to the goal post and you try to get to the goal post and ultimately you do want to score the touchdown at the end of the year from that goal that you said and you kind of talked about. I don't think you got into this, but your you deliver it every quarter. That's typically what you do. You use? Is it an email? Is it a presentation? Actually, yeah, actually, this franchise I do, I do weekly, monthly and quarterly reports. Okay, so, I mean I would I would assume a bigger corporations going to want a little bit more than, say, a local, you know, restaurants owned by one person. Yeah, so with the franchise that I'm working with right now, the way the reporting works is, and I'm just going to use monthly reporting, because weekly I don't really want to dive into that. Monthly reporting is we do the month and then we do the month compared to the benchmark for facebook and instagram. So you'll get one that just shows the overall numbers and everything that happened for the month of stay December, and then we'll look at it from December from the previous benchmark whenever we start, which was October. So it would say you would show the the variations and the growth from October to December of that year. So they'll get four reports. So they'll get four reports a month and how are you? How you delivering this? Just an email, just the email, like spreadsheet. No, happen. I use it. I mean this. I know that the show is by a core Poltz, but I use hoot sweet and I mean they have a reporting system in ny through whatever your system you're using. Yeah, you send it through them. Okay, if you drowne customer one and well, I mean I customized the report in the scheduling software and I likely just a data can change minds, for sure. I definitely done the Mak. You know what you're doing. And and then Brad ask a question here. Brad, of course, runs his own agency as well and does social media. What about track? I can engagement and growth to cells? Are you ever able to do that? I set the expectations in the beginning that I have nothing to do with the sales. Whatever they do with the information that I pass along from social media is on their own end. So if they're converting those sales, good on them. I to me, the growth compared to their sales is going to be the engagement from the content. The more engagement and the more people reach out for quotes and estimates, the more sales they're probably going to close, because the sheer number, like it's just math. Right. If in the beginning, if they're only getting a hundred a month and then after the first quarter they're getting three hundred, you know estimates a month, if they have a you know, a close rate of twenty percent, twenty percent of three hundred is greater than twenty percent of a hundred. So their sales department better be doing that, because I certainly don't work for their sales department. No,...

...but I guess it's getting you. A part of that would be are we saw that our engagement on during this month led to more sell more leads, more cells. What did we do right? You want to compare that to go, okay, let's do that, yes, or vice versa. Yes, it and I tracked that myself, actually that and I just started doing that. That actually wasn't an expectation that was set in the beginning, but I saw that, you know, the number of leads that were coming in from social media. So I just created my own spreadsheet report and since October, I mean they are exponentially rising. That the amount of leads that come in. So and Brad says he was hoping you would say that. So like I remember. Member, and this isn't franchise. So, but I'll try when I when I move back to the small town am I mean I got approached by newspaper. You know, they're still newspapers and small towns and they don't understand social media and the owner wanted me to do social media for them. I sorrcle. So I gave presentation, talked about it. He's all right, what, I'm only going to pay you a commission off of sales. No, see, I said right, see you later. But like that doesn't makes not on how at work and what even watch? I think I got up the water in his office again. It was a newspaper, remember. So I mean you got to have those expectations that, yes, social media managers should not be responsible for. Still, we are trying to get leads, we are trying to drive engagement and awareness and all those sort of stuff. But yeah, you're you can't. You can't most people. Most people don't understand that when they would look to have a successful social media presence, they need to work from there, either brick and mortar store backwards or their website backwards. If your UX on your website stinks and we're pushing all these leads from social media and you're not converting. It's not the social media's fault, it's your website's fault, however, your lead intake and however you're handling that. If you don't know how to do that, when all these leads start to come in from social media, you can't look and say that your social media was a failure. It's not. that. The pinch point in the bottleneck becomes how you're nurturing those leads once you get them to wherever you're getting them too. Very true. Then, knows about data related the franchises? We can. Yes, you got more. I do, and this was incredibly surprising to me because it is the only time that I've actually ever seen this. I'm going to compare platforms. Right. So they have facebook and instagram. If we post the same video to facebook that we do instagram, same day, same time, same video, same copy, same everything, it's incredible. I'm just going to use one of their facebook pages an example. So one of their facebook pages has, I think, like twenty Fivezero followers on it. That video may see a hundred and fifty, maybe three hundred views. Go to their instagram page that has five thousand followers. That video get two thousand views. Now on the flip side, when you post a static image on Instagram, it may get fifteen twenty likes. Facebook it's getting three thousand reach and fifty seven likes and twenty comments. HMM, it's amazing. It's usually the exact opposite. You think you would be. I mean maybe it's just the not for them. It's video kills it for them on Instagram and it's death on facebook. Still Images rock on facebook and it falls on deaf ears on Instagram, and your other clients is typically the way around. It is one hundred percent the other way around. Yes, that's so. That's so, but you would know that if you hadn't looked at that. And now. Did they know that before? Yeah, I tell them No. Did they know that before you started to see? You know, so it was something you had to kind of train them on our chains. That your truth be told. They didn't really have any kind of plan in place. They had never really they had a content Colendar kind of, but they didn't really stick with it and they were trying to do too many of this. Oh well, we saw this worked for some completely different industry. So they tried to do something similar and so they they kind of got caught up in like Oh, well, you know, I read this article in the best practice says we have to post this, but that doesn't work for you. Did look at your analytics? It literally says it does not work. That's funny. That's fine. Well, I appreciate you kind of diving in all these questions and time I think we could probably talk about this. This such an interesting topic and we maybe we need to talk about us more, because I know our our head of sales, Jenny Brennan. You know we we've talked about for our one of our ideal clients and customers as franchises. Of People. You social media for franchises and like how do you go af from? How do you find because they automatically boom, you know, they've got fifty, sixty accounts. They've got to add to it. So but it's a market that's hard to figure out and find them, but they're out there. You just got to go out there and grab that business and goes. So I appreciate you answer those goofy questions for me, but I love that you always coming on the show and yeah, like I just I like this, putting you on camera, letting you go, and I'm like God, I'm I'm just gonna sit here from any because you want to just I want to address one that I see off to the side here. And DEB says, are you work with other clients? Are this the only eggitar basket? No, I have other customers as well.

A conny customers you have in addition to this. I have ten other customers this I manage sixty, no, seventy eight social media profiles are sore. You Go, so I hope to dancy. Yeah, so it's not just do ing franchise. He also has individual clients and and then I manage my own as well, and you and you're all over the place. So you can go to clover media consultingcom find out a lot of stuff about any kind of see what he does and hopefully I think that links all your social and everything. You can do anything. A really good group on facebook. What's the name of the group? The Digital Media Creator Academy. Yeah, and it's a really good group. There's a lot of activity in it. People are always asking. So I think I think today there's a good nice he did interesting conversation about club how about? Yeah, you want to kind of way in, go over to the group for with Eddies Group and I let him know what you think, because I see my phone out of the corner of my eye just blowing up with notifications for my facebook. Everybody knows my opinion of clubhouse already by now. I don't own IPHONE, so it's I'm leaving at that for this point. Yes, I appreciate Hopp it on the show and I look forward to being on your cone in the future and you be back on ours. And Yeah, man, it was an honor to be the first one in two thousand and twenty one. All right, well, I appreciate it. Thanks.

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