Social Media Lab LIVE!
Social Media Lab LIVE!

Episode · 1 year ago

How to Use Social Media for a Local Business w/Bruce Irving

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Bruce Irving joins Scott Ayres, the Content Scientist of the Social Media Lab , on this week's Social Media Lab LIVE to talk all about using social media for your local business.

Bruce has found his niche in marketing for pizza businesses and we'll pick his brain to see if we can answer these questions:

  • Why Social Media is Important for Local Businesses
  • What Platforms Should Local Businesses Focus On?
  • How Often Should a Local Business Post Content?
  • What Type of Content is Best for Local Businesses?

Welcome to the social media lab live powered by AGRABULS. I am Scott Airs content scientists at the Social Media Lab, where we bust the myths, the rumors and the stories of social media marketing with science. On today's episode of Social Media Lab live, I interview my friend Bruce Irving from smart pizza marketing. Bruce and I geek out about pizza and I used to run a pizza business multiple times, so we have a lot in common. I know a lot about that industry. But the whole goal of this interview is to talk about how local businesses cannon should leverage social media. Bruce gives you some amazing tips and practical advice on how to use social media to your advantage, also some tools that you can use. If you want to see and listen to the rest of our episodes of social media lab live, go over to social media lab dot live. Social Media Lab dot live, you can check out all of our episodes here with social media lab live. Bruce Irving is from smart pizza marketing and his whole goal is to help businesses implement strategy and learn how to do local marketing correct and I'm excited today because a lot of you don't know. Those who watch me, Bruce said, knows how, literally like thirty seconds for we went live. I have a big background and pizza, in Pizza Management, so I'm excited to have you on the show the day, Bruce. Welcome to social media live, Scott, and thanks for having me on. I'm excited to be you bet talk a little marketing pizza. Yeah, I mean I'm hungry now. I'm at the older pizza for lunch. I think that's going to have to happen after this is all over it and Sarah says over she got. Sarah says she wants a chicken Bacon ranch. Chicken Bacon ranch is a really good pizza if you haven't had chicken Bacon ranch. She also says thin crust, sausage, mushroom onions. That's that's a good choice as well. What's your what's your favorite type of piece of Bruce? Right now I'm into Detroit style. You know, you familiar with what the drugs I'm not explain that to us. That sounds interesting. So it's a thicker style, but it's not heavy. It's a light okay, very thick crust dough made in a specific pan with cheese on top and then they put the sauce that's hot on top of the pizza after it comes out of the oven. It is a local place that opened up right down the street for me that started recently serving to choice up peats and they do a really good job. It's not an easy style of pizza to me good, but they do it really well and I'm just super into that and even talked to a lot, quite a few people on the podcast lately who are into that kind of style. That does pretty Dang good. So before we get into all this stuff talking about local marketing, I gotta know is where, how did you get into this niche of smart, smart Pizza Marketingcom is your website. You also Bruce Irvingcom and well, make sure we canclude those in the comments and shows us here in a minute. How did you get into pizza marketing? What's your background there? So my background is I was in the pizza industry. I was owner operator myself for a long time and I started in the pizza industry. So in Boston there's Pizzai Regina, is a pretty wellknown pizza concept here, kind of a franchise now, but more of a local northeast franchise, sorry, working there when I was sixteen making pizza, and then I moved on to another independent pizzeria where I met my future business partner. We ended up partnering with that Business and then we opened in a second one and I operated for from nineteen years old up until thirty five years old. I operated the local businesses. So I was in the trenches, doing the marketing, doing all these things, and that's how my career kind of got going. In the reason in this niche, in talking to you here about pizza marketing, is it's not. It's kind of by accident. I areed podcast. That's most things, right. Yeah, two...

...thousand and fourteen I started smart Pizza Marketing podcast. Oh, still operating the pizzerias in the reason I started the podcast was, you know, I didn't have a college education and we were kind of learning business on the fly, neither one of us, and but we had two locations, we had a hundred people on our team, employees that we were managing, and we were trying to figure out how to grow and how to manage people and I said, you know what, there's all of these people out there who have over he done it was really getting into podcast at the time because it was a allowed me to multitask. I can listen to a podcast while I was working, doing bills or anything, and there was no podcast for Pizza, the pizza industry at the time. You are a podcast. Probably get some of these guys who have five ten locations on my show and pick their brain for thirty, forty five minutes and ask him how they got to five locations or ten locations, or how they manage a five hundred employees or what tools are they using in it kind of grew from there and then, after doing it for a couple of years, peeople would reach out to us. I would share what we were doing marketing wise and also share these interviews, and people would reach out to us who are in the pizza inustry that were listening say hey, can you help me with my marketing? Can you we hire you to do marketing for us and write and it wasn't purposefully done. It kind of start off accent. So so you worked in the pizza where your manager? What was your role like? You ran the business? Is that what you did? So for in the beginning I was just a pizza maker and then I work my way up to manager and then I partnered in that location with my brother in law, who shouldn't be brother in law, and then we opened a second location together. So I was running the business with them. Now you y'all do because here's the thing, and most people who watched my show over the last two years don't know this about me, I actually worked in the pizza business. I ran a I won't name their name because I don't want to give a sponsorship name away or anything like that. But I work for a Pizza Buffet Company as a General Manager here in Waco, texts for about two years and then got into ministry for about ten years and my first job out of ministry was back at the same pizza organization, but in Houston this time for a franchise and was a general manager. So I've been in there. I've made the dough, I've I've made the pizzas, I've sliced some, I've cut, I'm I've gotten. I'd go home every day smelling like Grease and pizza and sauce and my shoes. You know you, I'm sure you remember this. Oh Yeah, you wore those restaurant black shoes that it were still toad for one, but they were that, you know, there were still were your slip resistant and the bottom would be covered in all the cheese and junk when you got in your car. Yet to Bang them out for you go in the house. So I've been there in the trenches. And but I love the business. I love the piece of business. Something about I don't know. People just get happy about pizza. It's a go too. It's an easy thing for people to go buy fish. If we got kids. I've got three kids and it's like we were a cheese pizza family. My kids are like, I just want cheese, I don't want anything else. They're not real fancy when it comes to there's. So yeah, I love the pizza business. I love the local this was pre social media. I'm we're talking like God, Ninety Eight, Ninety nine, two thousand and then back in like two thousand and seven, two thousand and eight, I went back and so like social media wasn't really a thing. So I love local marketing. We had local store marketing, Lsm, we called it. Was a big, big deal for us. But now social media course change the game, or so I think. I think this that's getting the talk to Bruce's is a fun thing for me because I kind of remember back to my pizza days. Now I don't miss the long hours, right late nights. Yeah, there were. There were days were like because we were open, I think like Levin, the nine, Eleven, the ten, whatever it was. And you know, Saturdays were the worst because you'd be there sixteen, seventeen hours and then have to turn around to get back up in six hours and reopen the store. And so, yeah's a lot of it. The weekends were the worst, for sure. There's others. It's not tough. It's tough business to be it is it is and it's hard to mark, it's hard to figure out. It's hard to figure out your local area. So I think it is a fun topic...

...to kind of talk about and and to see what see what you can offer us to help us out with with local store marketing. So what I kind of want to hop right into that. Now we kind of know a little bit about you and your background. Now I want to ask. So did you did you toss the pizzas or did you all use a machine that kind of just helped you flatten them out? Will you hand tossed them? You Han't to see. I wish we did. We didn't. We use we we we can't with the buffet place. You know, you're banging them out so quick you we had to use I forget if you call them now, but we'd bang them out and had stretch them real fast as we can. I guess a stretching machine. We'd stretch them real quick on the device and then you dock them and you you go on. But yeah, I still now today. Is Funny, like my kids and I will make pizza at home and they're always like dad, toss the pizza. So I'm the guy always tossing the pizza in the house. It's fun for the kids love that part of it. Oh yeah, it's a big, big aspect of it's so they give some background of what you've done and your experience in local marketing and, I think, the pizza industry, even though they are national brands and we know all the national brands. And again I don't want to name them necessarily because I don't know what your relationships are at it. You know, there could be a trademark infringement, who knows? But we had the big ones, but there's also a lot of local marketings that take place, for for a pizza business. I know the local pizza business where I do most of my business that they struggle to figure out marketing because they're their pizza makers, your restaurant guys. They don't know marketing. Their kind of confused by so I'm always trying to help them out. So here's my here's my first question for you, Bruce, is is why is social media important? NOT JUST FOR PIZZA? So we're going to apply this and not just pizza restaurants, but how is social media important or why is it important for a local business? You know, growing up in the business, I started right when you did, about one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight. In operated right up until two thousand and sixteen seventeen. So I've only been out of been a couple years and I saw that re evolution from us sending out, you know, fifty to a hundred thousand flyers a month to our local newspaper postcards, all that offline marketing stuff that we did. And for me I wish that I grew up. I wish two thousand was really two thousand and ten when we started to implement a social media strategy, because it's just so much easier to do a couple things. It's so much easier on social media to reach more people at a more cost effective price and it's also so much more accessible and it's way easy to test things out on social media. And then it is to do print, like we would do print and have to commit to five hundred thousand flyers for our local markets in order to get a good price for those printings, and if it wasn't perfect or it wasn't unwell and it tanked, that was a big cost for us. With social media, you can test things out on Instagram, on facebook, on Ticktock, and if it works, great, it didn't really cost you that much other than your time, and you can continue to do those things that to reach the local market and if it doesn't work, you can stop doing those things and then you realize that, you know what, that didn't work. But all I really invested in that was a little bit of time. Right. Yeah, I remember that. Like you talking about Kinko's. Course I don't know if Kinko's not even around anymore, but you'd go to Kikos in order a thousand brush flyers and yeah, and then there's a mistake kinder like crap, you know, or to special ended or the Cubon was no longer about order, or if you made the mistake of put an expiration date on it, then it's like I didn't give them all out and now you know they're all ways. So you had to do that, though. That's the only way you can mark it. And, like I think nowadays there's a whole lot more people on social media than off social media versus when social media just got started. So if you're a local business and you're not leveraging social media, and it could be any platform. I don't think every business should be on every platform. It really depends on where your market is. But if you're not leveraging that opportunity that social media gives you, you're really just missing...

...out. I don't understand why people don't. Well, I think a lot of us that fear like we Ian Anderson Gray's we probably both know. We talks about the confident and being confident when it comes to live video or our social media. People just are scared of it. They don't invest the time with it. But I think it's May put a little time into it and get you a schedule or tool and kind of just start working it. I mean I know for me like I've I've got a I was telling about the local business, and I'll name their name because they're not a company. Studa Baker's pizza and Gatesville, Texas. I dare to Google it. They we used to look them up there. There are cool. It's a husband and wife who own it. They have two locations now and I had a local business at the time at a bounce house business, so I was all about local marketing and they I was also doing social media, doing the stuff I do now, and they decide to create this thing called the colossal twenty eight inch around pizza that weighed like, I think about eight pounds or something like that big old pizza and it was like it was like thirty, forty, fifty bucks whatever it was to buy. I don't even know how much it. I've bought it multiple times and I don't even know how many how much I spend on it, but its huge pizza. And so they're like, we want to do an eating contest to have people eat the pizza and if you, if you eat it in an hour, you get it for free. Otherwise you got to pay for it and if you if you win, if you eat it, will put your name on the wall. All will give you a Tshirt, all that kind of stuff. And I'm like Gerald, the guy who owned it, I'll make you got to go live. You got to go live on facebook. And it's just like two years ago or so. He's like, I don't know how to do live, like he doesn't know, he just sees. He has a facebook page. You got it, lits of followers, you know, small town, two or three thousand, you know, fainty likes on a page, big deal. And by like you got to go live, you gotta life's like, how do I do it? I'm explaining it to him, how to go live, and so he goes like he gets his phone out, he goes live as guys starts eating the pizza, you know, and if and he just talking to the he's just looking at his phone, talking to it as people are common. It's like twenty viewers, thirty years, fifty viewers, a hundred viewers and just all of a sudden, like within about twenty thirty minutes, everybody's sharing is all over the place. And where a little town in Texas, and then all of a sudden it's like, okay, there's two, three hundred viewers, five, six hundred viewers, a thousand viewers, tenzero viewers and there is people literally around the globe saying I'm in France, I'm in Portugal, I'm here, and they're watching this guy try to eat this pizza in podunk Texas guy that he never gone live before. So the guy didn't get done with the pizza. He didn't need it. He he had like three four ments left and still like a core of the pizza left and he went through up off camera, luckily. But the cool thing was, course, his phone died right at the end of his like Hey, my phone is done, we're done, and he was out. The cool thing was was free for one. Social Media, for the most part, organic wise, is free, and local businesses, I think, lever it really, really well. But the next day the local news station said, Hey, can we come have some one of our our correspondence and the neat two pizza on live, shot armed morning show and broadcast live there for two hours. Duh, you know. And so he got all those free marketing from it and people keep buying that pizza and kids are buying the pizza for their birthday parties. And so I think local marketing is so different than national, big brand marketing because you got the personal connection. It's easier to some aspects. Yeah, I think my nigh by, neighbor has never come over to my house and knocked on my door and said Hey, you have to check out this flyer that I just got in the mail. No, no, exactly. Yeah, you. Yeah, they don't. I don't think you still get those flyers. But yeah, we're not looking at all. You shared it on social I gif. Some of you're doing something cool. You're posting great photos or whatever it might be, of your of your local business. People tend to share that and you people tend to know who you are. Yeah, I think with local businesses, to social media gives you a different way to market your business. You know, you can't do branding on flyers. You can, but it's hard. It's much harder to build...

...a brand that people trust and know and like by sending out postcards fire like. People want an incentive with those postcards or flyers to come into your business and that's generally what those people use those things for. With social media, you don't have to always offer discounts. You can do what you said and go live and build up no like and trust factor in your local markets. So when someone thinks of Your Business, they think, or whatever style of business they want to go to, that you're evolved and they think of you. Yeah, and I think that's where it comes into plays. Like you want that. I, like you said, the load, the no like and trust, which is like an old school marketing thing that people have gotten away from recently, it seemed like. But people want to know you, they want to like you, they want to trust you, want they want to trust your advice. They want to know you. And if you're in a local area, depend on your size, it might be different. But I mean, I know, I know. There's pizza restaurant. I would bend over backwards for these guys and help them out, and you do covid stuff happened and we're like all right, we got to go order pizza from him. I'm going to tip them like crazy, you know, I'm going to give buy a gift card, whatever it might be, to help them out because we don't want to see him go away after the fact. But they lever. If you lover social media, right, that stuff just happens really, really simple for you. I think covie's a great example of not a great example, but it's a it's a great example of why social media's important for local businesses, because we work with a lot of, you know, restaurants and local businesses and that aren't restaurants in when this whole lockdown happened in March of two thousand and twenty, the brands and businesses that didn't have a social media presence had a really tough time in the beginning because they had no way of getting out information about how they're handling the situation that they were in, like how are they handling the decreased capacity? How are they handling the sanitation? How are they handling the operating hours? Like people who had a social media presence and built up that brand over time, their customers just new to go to those platforms and kind of get a daily or weekly update, versus people who didn't had no clue and they would just dying because they had no way to get the message out. Yeah, I know. For me, like where I'm at is if it wasn't for facebook, especially because it tends to be in the small towns, especially facebook tends to be the hotter, the hotter thing for local businesses. You know, if I had to go to facebook and see if people were open and what they were offering and are they're doing to go only are they haven't dine in right, you know, all that sort of stuff. So I think the social media presence was so, so important for them, an important established and that kind of leads us to kind of the next thing that you kind of touching us a little bit is is what platforms if I'm a local business regards from pizza, if I'm a shoe store, if I'm a car lot, whatever it might be, what platforms do you think that we should we should focus on right now in two thousand and twenty one, I mean other than email, because this is a social media show. I would say emails very important. To make sure you gather emails from your customers, however they come in. That would be the most important thing. But Platform Wise, I would say facebook and instagram or probably the two most important platforms for local businesses. And I'm not saying that twitter and ticktock and pinterest aren't important. I'm just saying for the relevance of amount of people who are on these platforms conversion of turning those people into customers and the ability for running advertising to specific people in a specific location. INSTA, Ram and facebook just have the best platforms when it comes to operating as a local business, and that's where I would spend my time. I know they facebook owns both of them, so it's kind of tough to put all your eggs in one basket like that, but it's just how it is right now, in two thousand and twenty one at least. Isn't it weird to say two thousand and twenty one? By the way, it's hard for me to say that. Yeah, yeah, we're going to call earlier this week and I said two thousand and twenty still. Yeah, I just signed something for my kid yesterday and I was like twenty wait, it's twenty one. Yeah, so, but I think this true. I think it is still with a local businesses, most of them less wearing like a huge city. You know, I think facebook and Instagram is where you're at. Linked in, no, twitter maybe, but yeah, I think facebook...

...and Linkedin and space, facebook, instagrams where most people are probably hanging out. I think if you're looking to convert regular people on a daily basis into customers facebook and instagram. Like we have a lot of restaurants who do a lot of catering in right specialize in more corporate than household, and Linkedin is great for them to do that because they go there and they can find secretaries or people who are in charge of offices, office managers who run these used to run these office managers, and they could contact those people. Are Put out contents towards those people to get those catering jobs, whereas it's a little harder to do that on facebook and instagram. That's true. So that brings it. That's kind of like an that's like a hybrid of the old school Lsm the local store marketing, because I remember when I ran to pizza business mid my goal every morning when I went to the bank was to take, you know, are we had a cinnamon bread, you know dessert. I would take two of that I had to. I'd make two or three of those when I went to the bank and I would drop one off at the bank. I would drop one off at a local relator or an insurance office and you just make them smell it, think it. Their customers smell it, they think it and hopefully they come back over to is. So that's that was how we did, you know, marketing in those days. But so I think, well, I think it was cool, you just said. If you want to find those decision makers now, you probably don't walk in with the pizza because it's kind of harder, especially now, but you can go find them on linked in. So you can still use linked in to find decision makers, but you're probably not going to find customers. Are Right. You may you may well, those decision makers may turn into customers. Right, if they true. Eventually, I think that there's a there's a I think you have to look at what your goal is and what kind of business you have and then where you're located and then put those two things together and that's going to tell you which platform to use. Like you said, a lot of people in your use facebook. A lot of people admire use instagram. In facebook isn't necessarily the number one platform. It's Instagram, but it depends. Like there's no I don't think there's any one right answer. You can give like an overlaying outline of what you should do, but you got to go in there and test on your own and really figure out what works for Your Business and double down on that. Okay, so you say test and figuring out. How would I? How would I test and figure out which one's better for me? I think that's a good advice, sir. You know, local businesses very much know the demographic of their customers and if your customer based is between the ages of eighteen and thirty five, then facebook probably isn't a place you want to spend a whole lot of time because those people just aren't there as much as people who are thirty five plus on facebook. So you have data in your local market of who your customers are and who lives in that city or town or region that you serve in. By looking at that you can tell which platform you should spend time on. But sometimes it doesn't always go that way right like sometimes you think you're in a town that instagram is popular, but your facebook page is get is converting more customers because the people who are on facebook are just tend to buy more stuff than on instagram. Yeah, that's kind of what I found it like for where I'm at. Like I said, I used to own a bounce house business for about five years that had that my brother has it now and facebook blew up for me like facebook was all my I tried and I wanted to do Youtube, and you grant I still got videos there. The channel still going there. And we did INSTAGRAM, but no one really paid attention instagram as much. But Man, I'd post upon fact. I post a picture of a one of our water slides and and you know all the common how much, how much, how much. I did almost all of my booking for business on facebook messages, and I mean not email, not phone, facebook, my facebook messenger, apple was blowing up all the time, especially in the summer, whence hot in Texas. And so yeah, I think you got to figure that like. See where you get the most interactions, see where you can get followers and see where your audiences is, because they may not be where you think and they maye. Here's the thing I think people forget is they may not be where you want them to be.

Like your favorite platform may not be your ideal customers plat favorite platform. I say that all tim I often tell local business owners. Sometimes they look at what they enjoy and what platforms they use where their customers are, and it's not always the case. You have to look outside at the customers instead of looking at what your thoughts and preferences and likes are. You can't take that into your decision making process. Like you might love Instagram, but if you're in a town with, you know, people who are older than forty five, but it's a very high end residential community, that's probably not going to be the best place for use. From social might be facebook. So don't take what you like and do that. You have to look at what your customers are, or who they are and where they are, and then use the platform accordingly. Yeah, I think that's a hard part for a lot of people. I think the voice is that way to like. We're going to talk about content here in a minute, but I figuring out the voice of your customer, your ideal customer you may be. Like, I learned from a company I was that before this, when the locals it was a global brand where we were a bunch of dudes. There's like five dudes rand us, APP Company for talking like dudes in our s right, and then we started looking at our customer base and most of them were women in their S. I mean, when we don't know, we'ren't we got a talk a woman or thirty. So we had to get somebody who could or at least start talking more like our customers, because they're the ones buying from us. And as soon as we've flipped that switch, it changed everything. Yeah, because we started talking to our cusbom instead of talking at them, and that was so important and so different for us for sure. So that kind of leads into the next and thought. Here I'm talking to Bruce Arn if you're hopping over from Smart Pizza Marketing. We're talking about how you can do local business on social media, do social media for local businesses, and there's a lot of things you can do today in two thousand and twenty one. I know some places they're closed still. You know, California, of course, is like shut down forever. Maybe who goes? And even Texas, where I'm at, we're supposed to be down to a lower and lower opening. But you know, you can still do local marketing even in social media. So what type of content have you found through your local marketing has worked best, let's say, let's say for Facebook, for example, like what content of you seen work best on facebook? I mean it's the content that works best. Isn't always the content that local business owners want to produce, but I think video works best. We've seen it work far greater for being able to get the people, the customers, to understand what the business is all about in in that most efficient way. Like you can do a thirty second video and that's going to be you can get across a lot more information in a thirty second video than you can any photo or text post, and also you can build audio diences that you can retarget advertising to later when you to produce videos. The problem is not a lot of business owners are comfortable on video and or want to do video. But if there is people who do that, you have to embrace it, because there isn't a lot of people who want to do it. So if you are the one person in your market who does video, you're going to stand out even more because there's going to be ten other businesses who are like you, that are just afraid and they want to do I think that's key and I think that's, like you said, stand out, like be different, you know, like the pizza business restaurant I mentioned earlier. He went live and it blew up for him and yeah, I will for him, and that's he called the kastands the method in house here. Oh No, I love I'm a sign felt addict, so go for what is what is the costards the method, George Sands and the reas. I love Segnfeld to like I love that show. I think it's one of the best sitcoms. After this, there was this episode you probably familiar if you know the show, where George Gistanza. It's the hat episode where you got the FUZZ Russian hat. Yeah, yes, the Russian hat, and he would him and Jerry are sitting in the coffee shop and he was talking about this the girl who sold him the the hat, and right, and he wanted a date with her and George, and Jerry was like, George, she's way out of your league. And her three or four times, and that and that four time she got to...

...know who I am. She's gonna go out on a date with me. He's like, I just gotta get my foot in the door, right. So he went to the restaurant and that was one time. He took her on a like a date. That which wasn't a date. That was time number two. And then he forgot his hat in the forgotten. Yeah, forgot his hat inside of her apartment and then he so he could go back for the fourth time so he she could get to know him. Then finally, at the end of the episode, it was like she's like kind of started to like like him a little bit after seeing him so many times. So we look at it that way. We want to get you, not that we want you to be annoying in the beginning, but we want to get you in front of your customers multiple, multiple times, so that way when they think of Pizza, they think of your restaurant, or if they think of our hair salon, they think of your hair salon, because they're constantly seeing you in the feet. And video is the best way to do that because if they see a video of you, even if they don't watch the video, they see your face in the video in their feed all the time. They're going to get to know who you are without even having a really consume any of that content. Yeah, I think it's I loved it. I love that example because I'm if you know anything about me, you just like said, my love language is Seinfeld. So I have everything signed for you. Can Imagine I'll the question and we'll get back to your thought there. What happened to the hat? And no one ever knows what happened to the hat. He lost it, she lost it, shed she sell it back. It's like a tenzero hat or something like. No, what happened was stead of lane paid for, remember, a Lanky gotter. Remember. He got it back and he lost the good hat and he tried to we got a crappy one. Yeah, I got a crappy one. Yeah, and they then kind of fell apart in the rain. But yeah, I think that. I think that's true. That I think get in front of people and the more and if his video is hard, I mean we know that first, but once you do this a couple of times, you start to be own for it and just consistency. And it doesn't be perfect. I mean a local business, if it's just you on your phone showing off, let's say, your inventory or something behind the scenes, or a weekly specials or daylily, maybe your restaurant daily specials, people are cool with that, you know, but it's an access and it's set recognize, like I know for me, I mean, obviously this is the recognizable thing. And so after took a little bit, but after two years now, wearing this are every day on video and stuff. People recognize and they know it. They associate with our brand. For you, it's the same thing. Yeah, you've got you've got a look, you've got a style. People start to recognize you, and so local business can pull that off to just got to figure out what that niche, what that the lever is that gets people to to recognize them. I think. I don't think it's ever been easier than it is right now either. With stories as part of the way to get comfortable on video like those disappear after twenty four hours. You know, five years ago, if you did it, like when you did a video, it was you put it on facebook or you put it on instagram. It was a whole process, right, you had to record the video yet to upload it to Facebook, you had to edit it on your phone or on your computer and then you had to place it on your platform and it was there now with getting it. That was how you got comfortable. And then soon, you know, everybody who's not media producer or content producers, soon as you point a phone in front of them, even if it's not on, they get super weird and awkward and it's hard for them to like just be normal people. So it's stories. You can do that and build up that confidence over time by starting with something that disappears after twenty four hours. I think it's so true. I think it. But again it's just that if you're doing video, and I think video, we know video is especially on facebook anyway. facebook video afore it's live or recorded live, does better typically, but it gets higher reach. facebook really focused on it. Photos links don't do as well as they used to, but it's just about once you do a few times, you get used to like that. His stories like you can just pop on, Hey, here's a quick update. Boom, you're gone, you're out. Twenty four hours. Everybody forgot that. You stumbled over your words, and that's true. Ye'll be really cares. I think is I've never, I've never had a video and maybe like a this is for local businesses, this isn't for like these big,...

...huge companies, but I never seen a video from a local business and it was like, you know what, that was so horrible of a video. I'm never buying anything from right, right. Yeah, so I mean, I think, I think that vulnerability is important as a local business because it's that connection back to the human side. I think. I think of where I'm at, you know. I think of the Pizza Guy. I think of a local relator who's really good at video and just shows off houses and is always on video talking about it. You know, I think of a few car salesman. He's always shown cars where he works at. Here's a deal, we just got this car in a trade. Who wants to come, you know? So I mean there's a lot of things you can do it, but he's not perfect. They're just using their phones, they don't have a set, they're not doing all this other stuff. So I mean I think there's so much you can do on facebook, especially with video, that local business just seem to let you know to get past that fear due a couple of times. I know a gym that I go to. You know, are the guy who runs it. He was so scared the first time I do a live video here a couple months ago for a give away. Their opening back up after covid and he's given instructions on how they're going to open. He's like, is this thing on? Like for three minutes he just staring at the face face las IPAD. I'm like brand you gotta talk and and he's just staring. And finally, but the second videos a little better. Third views a little bit. Now I've seemed to like ten live video. He's in his car, he's just talking. He's used to a nice, comfortable he didn't care. He gets it. He gets it. The people are responding to it, they're watching it, they're listening to it, they're telling him about it. And doesn't have to be perfect, and especially its expiring. I think that helps. It's listen. I don't know how many live videos you've done, but I've done so. I've been doing list account since Blab was around, all Blab. Oh, yeah, so I've been doing live videos every week, all the time, and I still, before I get on this interview with you, I still get a little nervous. Oh yeah, yeah, so it's okay. It's okay to get nervous and that's never going to go away. Like the nervous factor before you go live is never going to go away. It's the people who can fight through that and be okay with the fact that you may mess up. It is live, there are people watching and you may say something dumb or stupid. Stutter all over yourself, and that's okay. Like it. We're as a local business. That's what separates you from those big, huge corporations and that's what will attract those customers that want to deal with local businesses and by from local businesses to you. What it's that accessibility. You know, it's they know they can make that cause I can walk into your store and go hey, I saw you on that facebook live or I saw you in that video, and they that low that no lie can trust factor is immediately connected right there and easier for people when they do that. So I mean, yeah, I think you just got to get over that fear factor on facebook as but now what about instagram? Like now, know, some business local do do well the okay on instagram. I'm reels. I love real I mean, is that for local businesses? Can Look a business leverage at at all? Yes, when your thoughts should leverage reals right now. So we're okay. So on my instagram, if you got a smart pizza marketing on Instagram, about eighteen thousand followers on instagram and we're producing reels that are getting a hundred and fifty thousand views on pizza video. Now we do a lot of testing on our smart pizza marketing that we could then show pizza restaurants what to do. But I think I've produced six or seven reels over the last two months and in the October I think we were on sixteen, fifteen high. Fifteen is low. Sixteen thousand followers in November of two thousand and twenty, so just a couple months ago. And now we're at eighteen thousand three hundred, almost eighteen thousand four hundred in the last two months and we've done six reels and I don't think any of those reels that we've produced over the last two months have gotten less than fiftyzero views. So I mean, so I'm pulling myself back on camera like all right, so reals, I mean, I guess stuck. I think a lot of people, and this is where I'm at, like tick to either the the tick tock of instagram.

I mean, do I have to be doin and what? What are local businesses doing with reels that I think we're you don't have to dance, you have to leverage the tools that instagram gives you in tick tock and reels. Right. So you can add music onto you think you could add little text as it comes up, like answer questions. I think the cool thing that businesses can do is, and this will happen, this how we got started in marketing. When we were starting with social media, we were like, what the heck do we produce for social media work? It's the company, right, like Hony Pizza. How many pictures of pizza can you put out there? And I'm like, you know what, we get this every time we answer the phone. And this was back in the day when, you like, it was just in that transition point from more people ordering online then calling. It was more people calling than ordering online. Yeah, we get the same question a thousand times a day when people call up. That's the content that you produce. What questions are you getting? Okay, asked over and over and over again that you can use in a video, right, so you take a question that you get ask in your business. For us, was like we know, where's your delivery range, and I could easily put up a video of me being like all right, here's our delivery range with music and over age. Be Like we delivered to this town, this town, this town, this town out in in a fifteen or thirty second video where it's it's a real and it's using the tools that instagram wants us to use, but it's not me making a fool of myself dancing, because nobody wants to see that. They might, I mean they might. Yeah, I think we can't. Nobody wants to see that. Trust me, I think somebody filmed me dancing. A social media marketing world is past year. Yeah, that was a bad thing. Yeah, but I think that's a that's a great way to use it. So answer question and I think we've seen, if you know, if you fall follow like Roger Wakefield or Allus, Marcus shared, and they're always saw about answering questions. So find out what your people are as. I liked your addause. I remember, I still remember, even though it's from the S, like how we and we had a script of how we answer the phone. Yeah, at the pizza place, you know, they can recall and see these pizza above about emels and Bosky. How going up. You know you've had all the soul, the whole thing you said, but it was always at when you open? Do you deliver? What are your areas? You know, how much is a large you know whatever might be. So yeah, but now for Real, zough, because they expire. They go away right now. They you will. You can have go away, but they you can have a preview. Go to your feed or they have their own tab inside of instagram where they all stay. So you can keep it there. So you can like have like a frequently answered ask questions section on Instagram, and then it's kind of just answer all those questions and have it there and send people to it constantly, because I think to efforts done. Can you so after you you saved it on Instagram, kept it on there. Can I later go back and share that to a story? Just yeah, mind people. Yep, and then you can keep it in a highlights. You could have highlights in your instagram where it's like information in like segmented information that you want, like frequently ask questions or where do we deliver or holidays, and then use those as highlights. For sure. Jennifer says she really wants to see that. I'm going to singing that she wants to see you dance. Not Know. I'm going to take that as she wants to see you, not me, because that's scribe want to see. That at social media marketing. Mike Alton has it still and it's we I got pulled into a Lou owl and so I'm when, you know what, I'm already dressed this way. Why not? And so, yeah, it was a fun sort of thing. So we're talking here with with Bruce Irving, was from from smart piece of marketing, talking about different ways you can leverage social media for a local business. We've kind of talked about you know, why you should do it, what platforms should be on in some type of content that you should be posting the where it's facebook video or instagram reels or story stories are really hot. Now the last thing I kind of want to in. This is a hard one. Answer. This is the toughest question in social media. So if you have, if you have an answer to this, like you should win a prize. I don't know. Okay, how often should a local business post content on social media? I think you don't you post. Yeah,...

...go ahead, I know you're probably going to say, and I hope it's what you're going to say. I think you should post as frequently as you can. There you don't think they're I don't think there is. I think you should have a minimum like think you need to be consistent with it. I'd think that three times a week minimum. You should be posting on these platforms. Three times a week to the feed, if you use an Instagram, three times a week to facebook minimum, like that's the bare minimum. If you could do more, do more. Your story should be two to three times a day and you should be sharing in stories on instagram like what's happening on a daily basis on your and your business, because sometimes, as a business owner, we look at the daytoday operations and it's like groundhog day. Everything is exactly the same. Monday's Monday, Tuesday's Tuesday, the day before thanksgivings, the day before Thanksgiving every single year. It's all the same to us. But there's customers and people following you on social that are coming in and out of your ecosystem all the time and if you show them that behind the scenes, that's where you build the customer relationship. You make an exposure from the post, but the stories and showing them the behind the scenes where you're going to build that relationship with them. Yeah, I like that. Three times minimum. I think that's still the old school, like we've always said, like at least through that. But I think, I think post as much as your audience will allow you to and still get engaged when you don't know. I mean like I think we had one of our I've watched the show to the day. Jeff Cy and and Eric Fisher. We're interviewing holly from Quirky Mom's, I think it's quirky MOM's. Quirky Mamas some like a and she posts us. I followed her page after that and like it's like a constant barrage of post. It's like all day long, three or four or five, six, seven, eight, nine times a day. She still gets the engagement. So there's no right or wrong, I think. I think when someone blames a bare minimum, there's a bear yemmm. I think you know. For me, I think you can like as a local business. You don't want to be annoying and you don't want you don't want to you don't want people to like. When you're a local business, your market is small, right, that's it's different. It's different for someone who's selling something nation ride or worldwide, where your audience is up all night. It's there's no time zone, there's no local people. But when you're a local business, like your market is very much your market. There's twenty, thirty, forty, Fiftyzero people who live in your town and that's kind of it. And they're they're from there. On social from six, seven o'clock in the morning till nine, ten o'clock at night, that's your time zone. It's a really zone in on and produce content based on where your customers are going to be on social. So you don't want to post seventy five times a day if you're a local business, because those people who are in your area are going to be like this place is annoying, I'm out of here. Yeah, I'm thinking. I'm glad you said that because I'm thinking of a local resell shop where I'm at. It's a fun it's a nonprofit resell shop, but I started following a new page they have where they're posting all their stuff for sale and it's like twenty five times a day. Yeah, that's a little bit. It's in my feed constantly and I'm already like day five and I'm like fix that. Then follow it, even though I'm I support it, I donate to it, I love them, but I'm like, okay, it's too much to. Yeah, you do have to worry about that too, but I think you know figure out what that balance that you got to post something, though, totally and you know, when you run these accounts, negative feedback that like on follow high posts news, those are all things that the algorithm takes into account when it's going to show your content to other people. So you don't ever want to get the negative feedback. That's why I said I would like you to post, if I when we consult with or talk to local business, we want you to post every day, every day. You know, if you can do one a day, every single day, that's great, because you're always going to be that's the CASTANZA method. You're always going to be showing up in front of people every single day. And like what tools, like a Gore, a pulse, you can schedule that out. You don't need to do it every single day. You can come up with one day of content and then schedule it to go out every day. Just be there to manage it. So I would like you to be there every day, but at least three times a week if you if time is of if you don't have...

...time. Yeah, and I think that's totally try. I think I think. Well, I think, well, you said three times minimum per week, but then utilize your old post for stories. Maybe. Yeah, post some stuff back to your stories. So you've done a cool video, you've got a real you've got a post even on instagram. Man, you can share that back to your stories later on, because now I read, maybe I saw it, and I'll do that a lot on my own personal stuff. I do that. Utilize, like the local businesses have team members. Utilize your team members and the restaurant industry we get a lot of push back when we say this to people because they're there. We say, I don't want to give my members the access to my accountant. And then I'm always like, listen, if you let your team members talk to your customers and handle money in your store but you don't want to get them or give them access to your instagram account, it's probably not someone you should have on your team. That's true. That's true. I mean because your team members tend to be a little younger typically. Yeah, and they know social a whole lot better than you do. So again it goes back to that thing you said in the beginning, like your know how your customers are talking, know what platforms are on, and then you got to know what kind of content they want and your workers may known better than you, especially if you're like an old crumungeine, you know, scrooge kind of guy. You know he's just in it for the money, but not in it for they don't understand the local marketing and stuff media. I don't think younger people understand business and how. Not all hers are run ADS, but they definitely know what's trending on these platforms and can give you the inside of like what what song is trending on reels or on Ticktock, or what type of videos are every is everybody in their town watching? Like they could definitely give you insight to that for sure. Yeah, that's an that's an opportunity to have more customers come in. Or maybe you create a trend locally and go crazy with it. Like you know, we had snow here recently in Texas, like on Sunday. We never have snow in Texas. Where I'm at. We got like four inches of snow. It was amazing. We made snow, man. We went sledding. I saw a guys skiing and our local park, whereas a big slant in a heel. He got out of Ski's and we have like our own ski slope. But businesses were posting like Hey, show is your snow men, for example, on social media. Local, local newspaper did down social they've been really good at social media here lately because we do still have a note newspaper, because it's local stuff and people like to talk and see their kids and all that. Man that they blew up like the post had hundreds of comments, everybody posting a picture of their snow man that they made, you know, because such a neat thing we don't have. We have we literally have not been able to do in twenty, thirty years. But you can find those things like hey, the local business, Hey, post a picture of you doing this, right, it's systems sort of trend locally. or I take a Selfie in front of this for a chance to win, you know, a free sub sandwich or whatever it might be. So I think there's all those sort of things you can do that. They are different. They didn't take a lot of work. Yeah, it's very it's not, is he it's not as hard as people think it. Yeah, you don't be a graphic desigre. You don't need assarily need to know adobe and Photoshop and all this other stuff, just not today. You don't whip out your phone, take a picture, take a video and post a Dank thing and I think you're definitely good to go. I want to see here. Let's see, I could Jim you can sing your hour, so like you could sing your store hours. Yeah, and if facebook and Instagram Real, that would definitely be something worth doing. Yeah, and I think I think we talked about with stories a minute ago. FACEBOOK are they're not levery for me. You know, I only follow primary on facebook. I've gotten where on facebook. I'm only friends with a small amount of people. I typically only follow local businesses. I don't follow national brands a lot, except in the marketing space. Stories are not utilized very well, but my local businesses and it shows up and when I go see a couple of people, I go what I do? I hit on one and I watched like six of them. So yeah, if you're just if you can constantly get yourself up there, even on facebook, I don't. We think instagram...

...a lot for stories, but facebook stories are so underutilized. I think they're underratable business. I think they are two because it's there and no one else is using them and it's just the first thing you see. I know at least I'm an Android user. It's the first thing I see on my arm mobile APP is stories, and I sometimes see it in the middle of my feed. I'll see him as well. So I mean the local business if you can find a way to make yourself always there, man, it's a huge deal. I remember when I was running the bounce house business. I'm going to read a lot of money on ads and I posted a lot. I remember I was only guy around. There's nobody here that did it, like one of their persons, and then one guy told me, man, you must be making all kinds of money, and mean you huge, because I always see you on facebook. You're on facebook and every time I open up facebook I see spacewalk of Gatesville and I don't like good. I means I'm doing marketing right right, you know, I'm constantly posting. Now what happened and we that business opens six, seven years ago. We got about three. Four years I lost Bruce. Maybe Bruce will come back. Hopefully he does. BRUCES hopped out, but we have what happened with that. That local business and there's Bruce. Is is what happened. That local business was kind of cool. Is Like I became known as the Bounce House Guy Because they always saw me on facebook, constantly, constantly, and now over and then I've got. That's about your three. I didn't have to run a single ad on facebook ever again. It was all word of mouth and recognition and brand recognition because I just they saw me. They connected it. So figure that out in your local market. I think you did the Constanza method before it was called the Castanza. I did, and that was a sign fel found even back then. So and I am master of my own domain. So we're good to go there. Yeah. So anything else about local mark I know we could talk on this subject probably for like days, but definitely any other like tips right now, January, two thousand and twenty one for local businesses that you think we should know about. We're going to get into tools next, or we're going to wishould I give a tool all that? I like right now. Yeah, give out. Go for it. All right. So there's a tool called dollar eighty. It's a tool where you could go in there and find it's just for instagram. But we did a local instagram challenge in recently in one of our groups and I wanted to get people to find local customers on instagram and as a tool called dollar eighty is actually from Gary Vander check. I think he's either investor or part of it. But what it does is it allows you to look for hashtags in comment and like local information. So you can do it on a large scale. It'll let you use any hashtags, but it's very awesome for searching local hashtags and seeing the posts like they come up on instagram and searching for local either towns or cities or specific addresses and Hashtag. So it's a tool that we use a ton to go out there and search and it tells you exactly how many people you've interacted with, how many comments you've left. It's it's a really cool too. So what I'm going to pulled up here on screen here, like what's that? Is it cost you a dollar eighty? Is that what it costs you to use? I think there's a free version, but there it's like a fifteen dollar month verdon to get all the pro but what it does is, like you put a location in there, because I'm very much when you want to build your local instagram following. I'm very much like look for local hashtags and then look for local people in local cities, because when you go to the search feature on Instagram, you can put in like Boston and it'll show you everybody who's posted with the location Boston. And if you're a business in Boston, those are people you want to interact with and get to follow you and get to them to like notice you because they've said they're in Boston. HMM. So this tool allows you to go in there and search for those cities, those towns and see who's making posts specifically for that Hashtag or that location or that business. I heard of that before. Now I'm like intrigue. I love the branding of it too. So yeah, it's really it's a neat tool. It's very easy to use. You it'll you can have multiple accounts now, whatever instagram account you're logged...

...into, it only works for instagram now right in it, but it'll show you the most recent post. It will show you the most recent the most popular posts, and then you can go in there and you can leave a comment, you can like it, you can like hop out of the dollar ty APP into instagram and give them a follow. It's a really convenient tool to use. Yeah, I saw. I mean like when I search for dollar eighty, it like it Gary vandage chuck was the first. That's its trag yeah, there's a free plane. So, like you get like ten daily comments hashtag targeting completely free. So yeah, that's, yeah, cool. A lot of people out of local businesses love Instagram, but their complaint about instagram is very global and it's like I want to have an instagram account, but I don't need people in India or Spain following me because I'm in Boston and that doesn't help me in this tool allows you to kind of go in there and specifically search for Hashtags or locations and find people who are in your local market, because doesn't matter how many. You have a million followers, but if none of them are your twent it doesn't make it different. Doesn't matter, I means the any number at that point. Yeah, I think it's I think it's where like Hashtag strategy and Instagram, especially facebook, is still yeah, on Hashtags, yeah, no one really uses them to people. We put them, but no one's really searching, you know, and that way. But on instagram. I mean I think that's why you have a Hashtag strategy. Know, for a local business is so different than like a agorl polse, where we might have huge we want to use some huge hashtags, some middle of the road hashtags, some smaller hashtags. I think you've got to find U S up as local have your own branded Hashtag. So if you're Hashtag Bruce's pizza, you know, create Hashtag bruces pizzas a thing. That way people can start using it down the road. But yeah, finding out what's going on your town and your area. It's hot. Yeah, that's a cool way to do that. For you'd be surprised how many people, if they went to their instagram account right now and searched in the name of their business, how many people out there are posting about your business that you probably don't even know about? Oh for sure. Yeah, they have no idea and they don't how to find it either. That because people don't tag it ride or, you know, they don't tell you know, they just take a location, but not the page and right. Yeah, so that's a really cool to appreciate your shanny any other like Ninja tools that we might not know about. I mean if you're a food business, snap seed for Instagram is a great tool, not even for Instagram, just any photo. snapseed basically takes a photo that you can take on your phone and it enhances like there's so many different features, but the one we use is the HD feature, which Bas enhances the lighting in the photo. So you could take a photo that you took maybe in your restaurant doesn't have Great Natural Lighting, upload it to snapseed, which is an APP that you can download on your phone for Free, upload that photo, hit the HD and it just enhances all the color. So it'll take a kind of a bland photo and make it look wow. So any any food influencer that you follow on instagram probably uses a snapseed to enhance the coloring in lighting of the photos that they put on there. And any business can use it too. Yeah, I think I remember, you know, the food business, especially, like you know, you think everything you look at food advertise, like you see the you know, the hamburger from the fast food joint on a commercial, like man, it looks so good. Then you get it. You're like like this, because they take it on the certain angle, they have it pointed back. They have it glisten. I remember. I'll watch even the pizza business, you know, they would take pictures of our buffet and stuff for the national advertising it. Are Pizzas never look like that, you know they you know, they glisten them up a whole lot. A lotting was different than angle what? But but yeah, you can still do that on a smaller scale. You should. It's you want to entice you if you just post your sometimes I see restaurants do this. They'll post, post a picture of like their in Cholata Plate, whatever, and it's like the nastiest looking thing. But man, just put a little filter on it, bring it out a little bit, you know, make it look different, and that's going to pop and show upen the feed. So much easier than just there's the refried beans and rice. I mean, maybe not either.

Pizza business. You want to just make your friends jealous, take a photo of whatever you're eating, upload the snap seed, post to your facebook page and you're good to go. Yeah, it looks like snapsied. You can get on Google play and apple store. I put a link, I think it should be the right one in the comments because there's not specific link to their website looks like, but snapseed dot online was what I found. So hope you has the right one. But yeah, definitely cool. I mean I think all those so there's lots of them out. There's something mobile APPs nowadays and even just instagram's own filters they have, you know, will help you out quite a bit. I think to makes a pop and stand because, again, your whole goal stop in the thumb. You got to start that thumb, and so anything to stand out's why I always like distorting pictures or making them black and why something that makes people going to go well, what is that? Are Do neck like extreme zooming in, you know, on a photo, kind of makes me want to what the heck it is. Seeah, there's lots of cool things that you can do there. What's the setting you use? And snaps need. So if you open snap seat, I'm going to open it up on my phone right now with you. If you open snapseed and it's going to say hey, tap here to add a photo, add a photo from your camera and down the bottom in the middle it says tools and then kind of in the middle on the left, it says HDR scape. If you just click on that. It'll enhance the photo for you and then you can kind of make it more enhanced or less enhanced based on your preference. But that's the only thing I use in snap seat and it makes a huge difference on all the photos that we use. Now got to work with a lot of local business owners who, right, let's face it, aren't photographers and photographers can be expensive. No, not saying anything that about photographers, but if you're a local business owner, every dollar counts. So if you can take a picture with your phone and use an APP like snap seat in for free, it's much more cost effective than higre in a photographer for a five hundred or thousand dollars to come take photos. And sometimes, you know, on social media, I found the photos that you take with your phone actually work better than in professional photos. Yeah, they look more real, they looks more real, especially if, like I the experience, if you walk into as you see a picture from a professional official with stock photo, your posting on Vo on your social media, and then you get it yourself and it's so, so different. Like, yeah, I don't think you should ever use stock photo now, but people do. You see it a lot. You buy as well, that's what I say. You shouldn't post. If you're option or not post, don't post. Yeah, don't go back to flicker click here in the old days. Yeah, yeah, so very, very cool. So depth says. Well, that's awesome. Appreciate appreciate that. So I want to hop over here. What we got you here for a few more minutes here, Bruce. You know, we've talked all about we've had some fun talking about pizza. Marky and you know I obviously can talk about pizza forever. Yeah, obviously. And they're at the pick your brain later about some good places eat once we're back out to eating outside of our local houses. How Far Away You from from Austin? Our and a half. Yeah, so there's a place in Austin Detroit style pizza. We talked about that. Yeah, via three and three. Look them up to look at via three, one, three. Yeah, let's look that up because, yeah, because I Austin's open. Well, Austin for the most parts open. So yeah, it's not very far from here. Great Detroit style pizza. I Fire San Antonio has got this, mad your I forget the name of the place right now. They've got the huge pizza it's like fills up an entire table. I get the name of it. It's like it's a fifty four sick to sixty inch pizza. It's really insane and you can't eat this. The slices are, you know, as long as my arm. Yeah, it's pretty incredible. So well, Bruce, I appreciate you hopping on the show. I know we've got a couple websites for you. Smart Pizza Marketingcom now does that a hundred percent? Just for like pizza people, or if I'm anybody, can I also get on there and then find out about you? Yes, if you go. We have two different podcast St Eve reserving calm is where we have the local business podcast. So if you're outside of the pizza...

...industry, that's the podcast where we talk all about marketing and everything for any local business, along realtor whatever it is. If you're at the restaurant space, smart pizza marketing a calm is the place for you to go, and I'll put a link to both of those in the comments. If you're watching replay or watching a live you can you can see all of that. So, Bruce, appreciate you hop on the show with me and I'm looking forward to rescheduling with you. I have to apologize in front of everybody I mess up on my schedule. I was supposed to be on Bruce's show a while back and I don't know, brain farted, I guess, and just missed it and I couldn't get to where I need to go with my equipment. So I'm going to reschedule and be on your show here soon. So I do appreciate you be on the show with us today. Thank you for having me. This is a lot of fun. Yeah, I enjoyed it to.

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