Social Media Lab LIVE!
Social Media Lab LIVE!

Episode · 1 year ago

A Day in the Life of an Agency Owner! Brad Friedman Interview

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ever wonder what a "typical" day looks like for someone who owns a marketing agency??

This week on the Social Media Lab LIVE our Content Scientist, Scott Ayres, is joined by his orange-haired friend Brad Friedman , owner of The Friedman Group.

The Friedman Group develops strategic partnerships with its clients to assist them in developing Inbound and Social Media Marketing Strategies that generate leads and deliver ROI.

We're going to find out what an agency does on a daily basis to gather leads, manage clients, what tools they use, and how they keep their sanity!!!

Welcome to the social media lab live podcast powered by Agra Poles. I am Scott, here's the content scientists at the Social Media Lab, where we bust a myth, the rumors and the stories of social media marketing with science. On today's episode of Social Media Lab live, I'm talking to my friend Brad Freedman from the Freedman Group, and the subject of our conversation is a day in the life of a social media agency owner. Brad really opens up and dives into what it looks like to run a successful agency in the social media marketing space. I really love this interview. Brad is such a good friend and I appreciate him taking the time to talk to me in this session of social media lab life. I do remind you you can go over to social media lab dot live. That's social media lab dot live anytime to see the other episodes we have already published on the lab that are Altho a live video interviews, and check out the PODCAST and, wherever you're listening right now, give it a five star review. I sure would appreciate it. Now onto my interview, but my friend Brad Free I'm going to bring on. My guess, and I'm not real big on like reading Intros, because I think it sometimes feels awkward. So I'm just going to bring him on and we're going to like sit here for a second and let you guys. I'll take screene. I want to see some screenshots and some tweets and some instagram post or stories from this. Hey, Brad, hey, is it like looking in the mirror? I'm well, I mean, but you know you're better looking, but I'm a little embarrassed that we showed up to the Prom wearing the same outfit and then I hate when that happens, for sure. So, yeah, Brad, Brad showed up a few minutes ago in the Green Room, as we call it, and had on his wig, which I send him the WIG here not too long ago, but I didn't know he had I didn't know you had a lab coat. That blew my my. How long have you had this lab coat? So I've had this lab coat for, oh, about five years. Okay, what kind of a joke? My wife had a number of different surgeries and I was always taking care of her doing stuff for months afterwards. Okay, Dream so I bought the lab coat and then I put this little name tag on it that says chief bottle Washer. Oh night, I was wondering what I was going to ask you what that said chief bottle, and so it was kind of a joke originally, and then I kept it and you know, look at you. Yeah, I think now you're officially like the best what I called lab sure, you know, out of anybody that I know, and you guess I have by far, no one's gone this far and putting on a la actually I think I've had maybe one other put on Lab Cup. They didn't have the WIG at the same time. So yeah, you definitely pulled it off. So I got to just tell you a quick story before we get into the yeah, I'm a I'm a hot guy, in case you didn't know that. So, I mean you didn't read that in my intro. Rad Hot guy. And so you asked me to be on the show and schedule it and because you're such a popular, busy guy, I had to schedule out like three months, is a long time ago. Yeah, so I schedule out and then one day I'm scrolling through Amazon, okay, and I come upon this hot AH I. Well, I'd have to get off camera to get I think I had that hat and other office. So I had to buy this hat and then like two weeks later, you sent me the...

WIG and I'm like, so, what am I going to wear when I'm on the show? And I thought, I mean, we're both it's a dilemma. I mean, yeah, if in my were do I love that too, by the way, and that's awesome, if you were to walk into my office like there. I mean, I've got one of those headband wigs right here. And actually, I'm going to say this now for those of you watch, and you got to watch silty inn and some one of you can win one of these if you're paying attention right now to what's behind me. Just going to leave that out there. Patients was behind me. You might get a chance to win one of these. But yeah, I mean I've got hats everywhere, I've got headbands, I've got an orange bow tie sitting on the floor next to me. So all the orange stuff is definitely fun to the play rest. So so, Brad before Wefore, we hop in where, you know, everybody's having fun. I see other comments everydy saying I love this, you guys are fun. Who Wears it best? I don't know who wears it best. That's a good question. I mean, you know, feel free to hurt my feelings. It's okay, Brat, Brad, definitely you. Brad's a braver person than me, because I've done this now every day for two years. Brad's just now done it today for the first time. I'll live video and so yeah, I would love to know. WHO. Do you think? Where's it best? That would be interesting to see what everybody says. But if someone doesn't know who Bradfrey, I didn't read your bio, like I said, but give us like your three thousand two hundred and sixty two elevator pitch of WHO Brad Freedman is, how you got started with an agency, and why should I listen to you when it comes to agency life? Sure thing. So I'm Brad Friedman. I am recovering attorney. I practiced law for about sixteen years and still I couldn't do it anymore. I have this character flaw where if I'm not having fun doing something, and then I stopped doing it. And so I stopped practicing law and I looked around and I saw that all the people that I'd been working with all those years, lawyers and doctors and CPAS, and financial services providers. They were not taking advantage of the Internet because of all the regulations that they have to follow. So I saw this sort of gap in the services being provided and thought, Oh, I could start a marketing agency and work with all these professional services providers who are not using the Internet because of there's too much brain damage with all the regulations, and I can use my legal background to kind of help them maneuver the waters and take advantage of the Internet to generate leads and revenue without getting in trouble. And in the meantime I've written two books and I speak at various places. So I have a podcast called the digital slice, and I also have an agency that's structured a little differently than some agencies, but we'll talk about that good deal. Yeah, you, you do a lot offers. I didn't realize the two book thing. I've written one. I did one of those for dummies books. It was a great experience. I would never do it again. It's like eat. Unless you like waterboarding and like getting your fingernails ripped off, don't do that because it's like such a long prospecially when you mom was on facebook, so it was facebook all in one. For Dummies and facebook changes like every two seconds and so like screens. Got It for screenshot and a rewrite. Yeah, I would never do that part of it again. So what were the books about? So one of my books was about doing social media safely, and you can sort of see both of them behind my shoulder. They're okay, yeah, and well, one of them was about inbound marketing for small business owners. Very, very clean. It looks like there's almost I'm going back to when I look at the one it says inbound. It looks like the logo for the Indian was colts. Yep, that's what that's what I thought it was actually a magnet. I see that now and as it dead. Yeah, but yeah, I brought you on full screen. I was actually able to see it. But we're going to talk about kind of what I'm calling a day in the life of an agency...

...owner and just kind of pick your brain a little bit to see what it's like. What do you do? How do you manage and Juggle all the things? So the first thing is, and this one could be this could be dangerous to ask, and so just I'm not asking about some things when it comes to this, but how does an agency owner start each day? Then you just spoiled it. So I know I can't go where I was then. Let's let's talk about number one, number two. So what's after that? What's the first thing you do each day as an agency owner? Is Regarding Your Business? Perhaps regarding my business? Well, to be honest with you, before I can get into my business mindset, I actually do start my day with a good workout and I'm a breakfast guy, so I have to eat. And then recently you eat normal. Well, lately I've been having a bowl of Cheerios, old school. Yeah, yeah, I'm three scrambled eggs every morning. That's mess my today. I had today. That's what I had with some as a mega go yeah, are so after you've done all the biology stuff, right, all right, see you're getting the business. What does that look? Oh, it's the first thing you do in your business. So the first thing that I do is I look at my calendar. So I'm a big calendar blocking guy. On Sundays I go through my to do list and I see what projects I have and what people I need to call and what reports I need to generate and all of those different things and I try to put them on my calendar as best I can to spread them out throughout the week. So the first thing that I do is I look at my calendar. Then generally I go into my email to see if I have emails from anyone on my team that needs things done or if I have emails I need to respond to from clients. So those would be the first two things I do and then, to be totally honest, and I'm not getting paid for this, in my beginning of the day routine, the next thing I do is open up a Gore a pulse, and I didn't ask Brad to say that either. That's why I said I mean I had I had the lower third ready, but I didn't ask you to say really totally honest, I did get the questions in advance and I'm thinking about how I start my day and I do. I open up a Gore pulse and I go into the INBOX and I look to see if there's comments that I need to reply to or respond to or I sometimes check the calendar. And it's just a very brief kind of you, as I'm in a Gore repulse all the rest of the day, and we'll get to that. In a little later, but that's really how I start my day. It's so counterwise. or your Google Calendar Guy. Is that really where you live? I am a Google Calendar Guy. Yes, that's that sense. I'm an android phone person. Android users unite. Yeah, that's what I am android. Thanks well, with my phone, but you know, we need Android, we need the clubhouse. I was thinking to say as non clubhouse users unite here exact live and we can have a whole the rant show about clubhouse, but we won't do that today. So yeah, so you kind of start off, you look at your counter see if you you if you got a meetings, if you've got, you know, client calls, see what's going on, if there's any like hot autumns you need to address. So anything else that kind of get your date going and kind of get you in. These are your other podcast you listen to? Yeah, absolutely, there's a few other things I do. So in addition to having to get my work out in from about two years I've been trying to learn how to meditate. Huh. I've been very unsuccessful at that. I am not a meditation person, but I did find this tool. It's called Heart Lab,...

Heart Math, heart math, okay, and you hook it to your ear and you hook it on to a your shirt and it has an APP where you learn how where you work on breathing. So it's sort of like meditation, but it's very relaxing and it's and you breathe with this like meter that's going up and down and it's keeping track of how well you're doing. So there's sort of some gamification, but it's right. It's been the best thing that I've been able to do. That's as close to meditating as possible. Well, since you mention a Gore a pulse, I don't know how I'm will come back to the second question I originally have. Let's go ahead and start talking about tools. So what are some tools as an agency that you use every day and what should if I want to start an agency, like, what tools I need to go no, well and get into and use on a daily basis to keep track of everything? So, Geez, I use a lot of different tools pretty much every day. I mean a Gore pulse certainly is one of them. I use ever note religiously to keep track of, you know, notes and projects and things. I HAVE A to do list. The I was using wonder list. I've heard of that. It was purchased by Microsoft and revamped a bit. So now I use that to do list. I use hub spot and I use nimble as crms and hub spot is my marketing tool for building landing pages and doing email and doing all doing all of our internal marketing work. I use the adobe sweet pretty much every day. I'm in Photoshop, adobe spark, maybe I'm in audition, editing a podcast and I use CANVA, I use wave videos, a never ending list of tools that I might touch every day. So you be like me, like we got too many tabs open and you get too many things going on. We had a competition like an and promptu competition in our our team yesterday. Of like someone took a screenshot of their tabs. Like, Oh wait, let me show you mine and know, by the way, I have three screens that look like this. Yeah, I always have too much. So what do you do? I'm not a photo shot guy. So adobe sweet, you're using that to create images for your clients? Yeah, okay, yeah, I use that. So I do a live stream show for a client every Tuesday morning and they're they are recruiting company. They placed medical personnel in military facilities and we do a show called hot jobs every nice, say, and the recruiter is talking about a job and I'm flashing up a graphic, okay, the job and overlay, and so I create those in photoshop every week. And Yeah, that's a that's a good example of one of the things that I would do with that. That's pretty interest. So, I mean we're this isn't this is tool related, but also just client really. So part of an agency you're running about. You're a pretty live producer as well. Is that what you're saying? Yeah, as a matter of fact, on that show and we're just hopefully making a little change. But I've been doing it now for about two years and, okay, I actually put on a shirt from the company, okay, now logoed hat, and I've created a background that looks like I'm in a studio, their logo on the side, and I start the show. Oh Hey, Brad, hey, I'm here with this week's hot jobs, and then I say something and I bring in the recruiters. That's pretty cool. Yeah, I actually get on there and intro to show for you. Yeah, it's fun and chair it's been very fun. Yeah, so that is...

...kind of shows me automatically, just so from the starting that, like the life of an agency is different. You know, you you've got comments you're trying to deal with. You got content to create, you got live video shows either to produce perhaps, or even host and be the you know, the talent on the show. So that's a lot already, just like in where to get like nine am Ya, you know that you're having to do and kind of a juggle. But yeah, I mean there's lots of tools that you'll have to use as an agency, like I use callendaly or calendarly, however you say it. Yeah, to schedule stuff. So you're going to have to as an agency owner. There's a whole lot of tools you're going to have to figure out, you know, to be an expert Adam per se. I do think, like someone said here, Andrew, I'm a Photoshop Guy, but also use adobe. spart. I wish I knew adobe. I am horrible at it. I tried a few times years and years ago to use it and then I just I gave up on I create my images in Canva, like you mentioned Canada. I do have any Canava or I'm also using there's that for thumbnails for my live video shows, there's a company. It was called thumbnail blaster or something like that. I got like a lifetime when those lifetime deals for forty nine bucks or whatever, and I create on my thumb most of my thumbnails inside there, because really is it almost feels like Canada, but it's our I know it's already set to the youtube thumbnail. Sigh. So I just kind of created something. said. There's so you've got to have a lot of tools to kind of in your arsenal. Yeah, to run a successfool and like you use callidly and I use acuity of her out also has the ability for me to, you know, set appointments and then, you know, I guess I also left out that. Occasionally, not daily, but I try daily, but sometimes I forget. I also use slack. Okay, yeah, yeah, it's a communication tool. Yeah, I think I spend most of my day it's like it's like I can see it over here bouncing, and so that I'm good. I've got a notification. I've got to go look at here and I've got, I mean like other multiples, like channels, to with different thing you companies as well. That I work with. So you're always just trying to go look at those. Do we leaving tools out that you probably use on a daily basis that you can think of now? I mean, I don't think so. That's a lot. That's a lot and that's a like keep up with. So I'm I guess my incuragion will be for people is like find what works for you. Like you. You may not be an adobe person, and that's fine. Be a canper person, you may not be to do a person your own. Ever, know I've got I have to do us and I used to use it like crazy, but then I'd forget to go. I had in right now. It shows me I have five tasks are overdue in the corner of my chrome browser here, but I'd forget to go over to it constantly, and so I just I use a list now I literally write it down and you can see the name of that. I won't say it out loud, but I love it because I'm getting out of my brain. If you read, if you've read the Geep, you know the GSD books. Is a GSD book actually, you know, getting all the stuff out of your brain, whether it's on ever, know it's on a to do is it's on paper. Frees you up really quickly and then you go check it off. Makes me feel good when I check it off. So sometimes I write on my list, make to do lists to make myself feel good when it's all said and done. Se Yeah, so we've talked about kind of how you start your day other than breakfast and meditation, and I think you should do all those things. I think the exercise meditation get your mind right, right where you get to work and for you start working. For me, you know, I I'm a remote worker. You know, our company's based in Paris, France, but I'm in, you know, a little town outside of Waco, Texas, and I actually don't work for I can work from home most days, except when I need to alive show because my internet so bad at home. So I actually, even when I don't have my live show, I still come to my office because it just gets me in that work feeling and then I know...

I'm in a sense punching the clock when the day is over and I don't touch my laptop, I don't look at it after a specific time. I think even if you work from home as an agency owner or or some may work for an agency. Having set times and knowing when you're starting stop is is so important, very important, than if you're if you're married in the relationships. Yeah, yeah, you definitely got to forgot to cut that off. Course. I found I found I's been way too much time in the last month playing the game among us and I was was any among those users out there? My a ten year old son has got me addicted to it and I'm about to approach a thousand games played in a month and I will be getting therapy for that later on. So let's hop to the next question. One I and this is obviously was the one I get probably the most excited about, because it's, you know, Geeky stuff, but related to your clients. This is probably client specific. I was saying, what data is important to you to look at on either I put daily here, but it could you could say let's go daily first, and maybe what's something you don't look at it once a week, once a month, that sort of stuff. Sure, sure, so for a couple of my clients we do some facebook adds. For those clients I actually have a specific budget that I'm allowed to spend every month. So pretty much daily. I go look at the facebook ads. First off, I look to see how we're doing on the budget, especially this time of the month, to see if we're getting close to reaching the budgeted amountain. Sometimes I have to turn ads off maybe a little early because I've reached my budget. But then I also like to look, of course, to see how they're performing, how the individual ads are performing. Are My video ads performing better than my ads with images? Are Certain images performing better than other images? I so I take a pretty good look at the facebook adds before pretty much daily, just to see those kinds of things. The other data that I look at for sure daily, again going back to my agora pulse use for each of my clients. In Agora Pulse I'll go into the reporting feature and I will look at audience growth. I will look at engagement impressions, the Brand Awareness Data, just to see how I'm doing. I'll scroll down and see what the top posts are and again do some analysis of that. Was it a video that I posted? Was it a facebook live? Was it an image? Did it not have an image? A lot of what I do in my content creation for our clients has based on data learned right here in the social media lab and and little experiments that Scott does. So a lot of times we're making shifts and tweaks based on data that I get from Scott's blog and videos. So you know that I look at daily. So when you say are there podcast, so you listen to I like to follow you on twitter so I can see what the experiments sorry and see what I need to learn. Yeah, I think you hit on some inners and stuff. They're like. Fore, you want to look at your ad I you're running adds for people. That's you better be on top of that because you're blowing. They're going to blow and you're spending their money and nesting their money. Really is probably where you probably want to use as an agency, but you're using their money and if it's going to gone to ride or it's not converting the way you thought, you've probably got to make some quick adjustments. So I would definitely think I could see where like add dat is so important to hop in, especially it's a huge budget, because they're going to they're gonna know and be able to sell if that didn't perform like hey, we did. We spend a thousand dollars in this add and you got his one lead, you know, right, and so you're gonna know, because every two weeks we have a team...

...meeting where I have to report. Yeah, it's so. Yeah, I think the add data is as probably I could see that, where it's a daily thing and then from there, like you said, seeing what has performed yesterday. You know what did well, what didn't do well for a certain page, and kind of make some evaluations in a just now do you like when you looking at the say, content, especially organ let's let's talk organic for a second, which we know facebook specifically. Is this tough? Let's be honest, right, how quick will you make a shift? If it's if you saw some of that work yesterday, do you try to repeat it today to see if there's an anomaly? Do you wait a week? What do you normally do? Yeah, I I don't generally do something that quickly, just because, especially when you're talking about organic, sometimes those things do change a little bit over time. But I might make a change, you know, the following week based on something that I learned the week before, not the next day right, possibly the following week. And I am always changing things up and testing and experimenting and and, you know, seeing what's, what's works and what doesn't work. And you know, to be honest, just because something worked last week doesn't mean it's going to work this week. But we're class hour. Yeah, I mean our things change so quickly that I really feel like it's just a matter of posting regularly and consistently, regardless, and you know, when you find something that works, do it again, but know that the next time you do it it might not perform the same way. So I will and we'll talk in the next question. We'll talk about in seconds how you communicate with your clients, but which already allude to a little bit. But what, in your opinion, all the all the different clients you've had from different industries and whatnot, what data to them is like? The first thing they asked you about it was what do you see as the most important data, just in their minds, even if they're wrong, what do they want to hear from you? Right typically, every one of my clients, from the first day that I started my business, is focused on generating revenue. So I can give all the data that exists. Here's how many impressions we had, here's what I reach was, here's how many people clicked on that ad or that post, and most of the time what they really want to know is how many leads did we get from that, how many of those leads were qualified and how many of those leads did we close? So a lot of the data that I provide gets sort of mixed with internal data because most of the time, while all of the time I don't know if they talked to a qualified lead, whether it they deemed the lead to be qualified, and I don't know whether they closed the lead. So when we meet we communicate back and forth. Okay, I get we had all those impressions and reach and Clicks and on our side all of those impressions resulted in x number of qualified leads and x number of leads that we closed. So generally that's what they're most focused on. Where I'm trying to get people to think about building community and how important these, the likes and shares and comments are. They get that, but they get that if they're turning into revenue. Yeah, and I think that's the hardest...

...thing for a specially business owners. They want to the bottom line, like you are, you are you in my investment leading to more cash in the bank. But I think that's where you I think you as an agency owner, and I'm sure you do that, you've got to set expectations from the beginning of what you can and cannot impact. I could see where they look at social as a whole and links that you maybe post or ads that you run. You know, I did. They lead to more leads, trials, signups, whatever, you know, right product might be. But yeah, the community side is hard to sell, I would think, to a lot of business owners. Yeah, I mean, you know, and you hit it right on the the nail, right on the head with setting expectations. On My side of it, I can drive traffic to your website or to your job posting or your landing page or whatever it is. I can make suggestions as to whether that landing page or website page is designed, you know, effectively and all of that, but once they get there, yeah, my job is over. Yeah, yeah, I think you know, and I did with that too. Like my whole goal is, you know, for the for the lab is I mean, I mean I'm not no reason shy away from it. Yeah, I want to send people to our website, to the lab. I want them to read I want some sign for emails. I went some signed for trial for goorl pulse and kind of filter down the funnel hopefully sign up, but got control in that S Ql. Those cells, qualified leads. As a social media managers and AG sometimes hard because they may have a really crutty audience to start with, and that's where I guess your ads would probably come into play, where you know, okay, this is ideal client. You know, are we called the ICP, the ideal customer profile of my marketing manager should be watching this and know that. I learned that at our tree and I just said it in our live video. So deb was watching. She knows that. Just said that. But you know who that ICP is, and so you you you're the expert now. So you target those ads a correct way and that should lead to those cells, to all that revenue and that sort of stuff to justify it. Yeah, and you know on that expectations setting side, developing a really good engaged community on your facebook page or in your group is also a way to get to those qualified leads and closing them. So I do set expectations about building the community so that it's not me really just doing all these things and then saying hey, my job's over. You didn't close them your you know that. It's your fault. I got enough people to your page. But we have expectations about growth on our business pages and growth in the engagement of our posts and videos and and all of that too. We have all kinds of KPIS, kettle of Okr, kpas esqls and qls, Mrra aarr, all this stuff. Yeah, you don't know any that is Google it our ascos and will tell you. So. Even looted this a little bit earlier about having a we a meeting every two weeks with some of your paid clients, and you'd be right. And adds in general. You know, what kind of communication do you have with your clients? On it like a daily, weekly, monthly basis, and what? How do you set that expectation? How do they I'm I'm sure some of them want to buck you a lot like how what was it look like typically ideally for you? Right, so, first off, my clients are are retainer clients. They pay a monthly retainer which basically gets them access to me and the team. I wouldn't say two seven, but because you're your retainer clients, I mean your were attentive to your needs. Generally speaking, I in the best case...

...scenario, I provide monthly reporting to my clients and I now do that generally with a zoom call where I put together a report of all of the things that we have agreed that I'm going to report on, and every client is different, and so in the best case submix scenario, I'm doing that every month. So it's usually toward the end of the first week of the month where I report on the prior month. So I have some time to get all that dad and it might include Google ads facebook ads, as well as all the community management work that we do. It could also include work that we do for inbound marketing on landing pages and email marketing, and you know how many people open the email and how many people clicked on the link and all of those kinds of things. So I would say if we start with monthly reporting, I do have one client where we meet every other week. I still only give them a monthly report, but every other week I do some kind of this is where we're at now reporting and then other than that I respond to emails. Sometimes we'll have a big win and I'll said take a screenshot and notify the client. Hey, you know, here's a post that went I roll or something like that, just so that they know that we're you know, we're working and stuff, but there's really no rhyme or reason. It's not every day I go through my crm and say, okay, I got a call this client in this client, in this client to update them. I really try to keep people on sort of a monthly PLA schedule when I can. Now, what do you do when a client is bombarding you and it's like daily, they're just you know, is that when you say we're wrong, fit or this is what we're doing, like are you like, how do you? How do you deal with that guy? Mean and in real estate I'm sure it's happened like where someone just outed you. How do use an agency owner deal with that? So you know, first off, and I learned this when I was an attorney and was very, very busy, and one of the things that they don't teach you in law school is how to deal with clients to call you all the time. But they do teach you that you try to make every client feel like they are the only client that you have. Sometimes that's hard. So when somebody's bombarding me, at least initially I'm gonna take it, I'm gonna deal with and then at some point what I try to do, because normally they're just quick little questions that need to be answered, and so at some point I recommend to the client that they actually make a list and instead of sending me something every single day, how about on Mondays or on Fridays, you send me ten little questions that I can respond back to her. I'm we maybe we get on a zoom call and you get it all out of your system all at once, but I do really honestly try to make every client feel like they are my only clients. So sometimes it's juggling, sometimes it's not putting my computer away at six o'clock or whatever and responding to their email at eight o'clock at night. But yeah, I think that goes back to I mean, what expectations have you set with them from the beginning? Right? They know your hours and know, hey, I can't answer every single call, but I'll get to you. I think. I think long you had those expectations from the beginning. That shouldn't theoretically get you in a pickle, but I could see where, I give a clients got a problem, their...

...instagram account suddenly suspended or something happened to their ad or you misspelled something, or there's somebody going off on a page and ranting or, you know, being rude. They're going to reach out to and you got to deal with those fires right when I absolutely come up and that's you know that that happens. But again, it is it's setting those expectations and it is a matter of setting sort of regular check ins. Right. They don't necessarily have to bug me every day because they know on Friday I'm going to check in or something like that. Sometimes I have to do that. Now this is this is a secondary question from something you said earlier, because I'm just curious because I'm not a former lawyer, so I don't understand. I've never had to do the concept. You said you're on a retainer. That's it's that common in agency life? Or is? And how does that work? What does that look like? Shit? Should everybody do that or what are your thoughts are that I have? You're on the few people have heard say that when it comes to like agency social media management. So personally, I think everybody should do it because it helps you with your own budgeting and cash flow. So basically what I do is I start off with a client, I do a fairly lengthy discovery call where I learn about the business, I learn about, you know, what they're doing currently with their marketing, and then I come back and I make a suggestion, I make a proposal and I say, look, I want to develop a marketing strategy for you. I've decided based on what you're doing, here's the channels you need to be on. I'm gonna, you know, put this all together, and then I create the strategy and, based on the scope of work from the strategy, I say this is what it's going to cost you every month for me to do these things, and it includes, you know, when we were posting three times a week and we're responding to posts and we're doing a video and we're doing reporting and we're running thousand dollars worth of ads a month and this and that and this and this is what it's going to cost you every month for me to do that. I have some clients where I don't do the implementation and I'm just doing the coaching and that's a monthly fee that gives you access to me every other week for a coaching session and then, you know, some other time in between. But for me, even if I'm just doing sort of a one time project, there's a cost associated with it and if I can get it up front, all the better. If it's happen with the beginning and half at the end, sometimes I'll do that. But when I was practicing lie I had to do a lot of hourly billing, and I don't like ourly billing. We mean yeah, because you're not getting paid till after the fact and that instance right and to be honest, it really devalues the work that you're doing because you know, you never know how long it's going to take and if you're only worth whatever, hundred and fifty, two hundred dollars an hour, sometimes you get done and feel like wow, that was really worth five hundred dollars. Now I get away from that and just say hey, this is what it costs for right every month for me to do this good deal. So I'm going over to our last question. Just hopped on and watching talking to Brad Freedom from the freedom and group about the you know, typical you know, if there's such a thing day in the life of an agency on in the last one. You even mentioned the word Juggle earlier. You've got your existing clients, you we know now you're sitting expectations of it's, you know, weekly, a monthly sort of reporting...

...to your existing how do you, as an agency owner, and most agency owners are only a few people and in as, especially starting out, may just be the one, how do you juggle existing clients but yet still try to find new clients? For me, this is really the hardest, the hardest question that you've asked all day. You're welcome. I saved it for last. Yeah, I mean it really is. So I have some lead magnets out there, I have some landing pages. I am trying to use my practice, what I preach in my inbound marketing, you know, skill set. I do a monthly newsletter. That's not always monthly. Mean it really is the area that I struggle with the most because I honestly feel like my responsibility is to my pain clients. So some months my own lead generation work suffers, and that is such an important part of running an agency is that I always have to be trying to manage prospects through the buyers journey and nurturing them along until I get them to the point where they're ready to buy. And often times that's that's my biggest struggle of the day or of the week or of the month. Yeah, because I think you know, you're trying to make sure you hit all those expectations and you got people who've paid you. But you got to be I think, anyway, just mut me thinking out loows, you always got to be prepared for one of those existing customers to slip off, right, you've always got to have some barn. Then you also got to worry about take it on too many clients and so because you can't handle it. And so I'm sure that's a balancing act. That's it's really takes some time to figure out. Like I can I know I can do let's. I'm just using a number out of my head, because on one hand I can do five really well, you know, and I stick to the five and I'm not looking for anybody else. But suddenly one drops off because they want a business, because of covid and now I'm like, Oh, I've just lost a fifth of my revenue and I've got nobody waiting to come on. That's where I think you know, I could see a huge you struggle from most agencies. Yeah, and that absolutely happened to me last year about I had really at once all but one of my clients, I'm decide that they needed to make some changes. It's always easy to cut your marketing budget. Yeah, business owners look at that as fluff anyway, even though it's probably the most important line on their budget. So, yeah, about last May my agency took a hit. But the beautiful thing about the way I'm structured is that it's me and then I have a number of contractors that I work with, so I'm able to pull in these very skilled people for specific projects. But I don't have full time employees that I have to make salary with. I do have a full time need to put food in my mouth and, Hey, my mortgage, which is sometimes challenging as an agency owner, as it was for several months night. I bet. I'm sure it is. So I think, I think a good thing maybe is always kind of have those feelers out there. Absolutely no or yeah, if you got one client that you know loves you in a certain industry, Hey, that they know somebody else in that industry that maybe you know. You do you keep them in the waiting and maybe I could take them on and hire somebody to do half of it or absolutely see. I think that would be the biggest part. I could see that. And now I and I added that question he because, like I think this is some time I'm sure every agency owner to struggles with is how do you do both? I think I saw depth say it sucks. She's got her own agency as well, and sometimes it's I'm sure that does so trying to manage both,...

...trying to keep expectations as high as they are. But yeah, we're what's the balance? Like I even do it it. I don't have agencies, but just for my own work. Okay, can I take on another thing of this? Will this suffer? Yeah, you got to figure out that, that balance for sure. Anything else that we need to talk about in the day in a life of a typical eight, I think we only got it to like ten am. Yeah, yeah, we're about thirty. I mean the only other thing that I could just thought of, as you mentioned it, is, you know, there's got to be a time to do some of that administrative work and the bookkeeping and the bill pain and those kinds of things too. And so some, you know, bigger agencies will farm that out, have a bookkeeper or a cfo or some kind of accounting team. I mean me personally like to be I like to be lean and mean, and so I'm in quick books, not daily, but I'm in quick books and I'm, you know, paying bills and trying to do that myself. And fortunately, you know, it's not a it's not a huge undertaking, but it's an important thing. I just had to get my ten ninety s in the mail. That had to be done before the end of the year to all of my contractors and you know. So there's that side of it too. Yeah, with I would think maybe setting up a time per month that you do that, as probably comes into my calendar blocking. Absolutely, Brad, I appreciate you being on the show a game with me, like you said, he I really show like you booked like three four months ago, so just in time get your hair and get the lab coat ready. All that. Love being on the show with you. I so appreciate you asking me and all that of having you and you're always a champion for for the work we do, you know, to Gore Poles and the lab and everything else. So we're what is the best place to define Brad Freedman? So the best place other than on the the bulletin boar at the police stage at the post office? Yeah, I was going to say aside from that where you'll see my picture on the wall. Freedman Social Mediacom is my website and from there you can get to all of the social media channels and everywhere we are. But yeah, I just assumed everybody started the website and see what I'm all about. Thanks again for listening to the social media lab live podcast. If you want to see the rest of our interviews and watch the full videos and see everything we're doing here at a Gore Polese and the social media lab, go to social media lab dot live. Thanks.

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